Professor Galbreath’s undergraduate renewable energy class studied Nashville’s first solar farm onsite yesterday.

By |

   
    Print this page Email this page
Professor Galbreath’s undergraduate renewable energy class studied Nashville’s first solar farm onsite yesterday. Here are some facts we learned: 
The Music City Solar Project is only the 6th community solar project in the 7-state Tennessee Valley Authority region. It is the largest and first TVA approved DSS program project. Construction began in April, 2018 and was completed in 120 days. The solar panels cover 8 acres of the 35 ac total site and generate enough power for roughly 210 homes. There are 17,020 Cadmium Telluride panels installed which were made in Perrysville, Ohio. Each panel consists of two pieces of glass sandwiching thin-film Solar PV material. Each panel is rated for 117.5 Watts and will generate 13 kilowatt hours per month. The solar panels are mounted on metal racks, tilted at 27 degrees, and fixed to 1,260 concrete forms that weigh 3,500 lbs each to avoid digging footings into the former landfill site. NES owns the site and expects the panels to decline in efficiency 0.6 % per year for 20 years. The Tilt of 27 degrees is not an optimal angle for this region’s generation capacity but is needed to manage glare from the glass and to account for the DC to AC inverters capacity sized per the site design. Construction and 20 year maintenance costs are $3.2 million or roughly $1.60 per watt. The site contributes roughly 23,500 volts AC continuously to the grid when operating. As a comparison to other state’s and city investments in solar energy, 96 cities in Massachusetts have one or more solar farms in their community. This project resulted in part from the leadership of two Nashville Mayors, their sustainbility staff, NES CEO Decosta Jenkins, and the Livable Nashville Committee’s recommendations.
 
 
students with solar panels