Lipscomb University

Christian Scholars' Conference

Session Abstracts

Session 1: Wednesday June 6, 10:15 – 11:45 a.m.

American Religions

"Best Practices: The Stone-Campbell Teaching Archive" - Ezell Center 205

Elizabeth Rivera, Lipscomb University, Convener

  • McGarvey Ice, Abilene Christian University
  • John B. Weaver, Abilene Christian University
  • James L. Gorman, Johnson University, Respondent
  • Doug Foster, Abilene Christian University, Respondent

This session explores the Stone-Campbell Teaching Archive, a new online repository of digitized images from ten different university/seminary archives, selected due to their value for teaching and learning about the Stone-Campbell Movement. We will reflect on the pedagogical principles that shaped the SCM Teaching Archive, including the use of published works as an organizing framework, and also provide an introduction to its use. Through hands-on review and practical discussion, we will seek to identify potential improvements to the website, and to identify other current and/or potential Digital Humanities projects related to the Stone-Campbell Movement.

Christianity, Literature and Language

“Are Movies Prayers? A Round-table Discussion of the Spiritual Function of Contemporary Film” - Swang Center 230

Darryl Tippens, Abilene Christian University, Convener

  • Susan Blassingame, Lubbock Christian University
  • Joi Carr, Pepperdine University
  • Brad East, Abilene Christian University
  • Cori Mathis, Lipscomb University

In this session participants will consider the central claims of Josh Larson's new book, Movies Are Prayers: How Film Voices Our Deepest Longings. Does authentic prayer transcend formal verbalization to include various expressions of human yearning, mournful lament, honest confession, and joyful celebration? If prayer is “a raising of the mind and the heart to God,” then might our favorite movies actually be forms of prayer? After engaging Larson’s definition of prayer, participants will discuss particular contemporary films that might be seen as a means to spiritual formation. Time will be reserved for comments from the audience.

Civil Rights

“‘The Stolen Beam’: A Critical Analysis of Reparations” - Ezell Center 109

John York, Lipscomb University, Convener

  • Rabbi Philip “Flip” Rice, Congregation Micah, Nashville, TN: “The Stolen Beam: A Sermon on Reparations”
  • Gary Selby, Emmanuel Christian Seminary, Milligan College: Response from Rhetoric and Homiletics
  • Catherine Meeks, Wesleyan College, Emeritus & Absalom Jones Center for Racial Healing, Atlanta: Response from Civil Rights
  • Stanley Talbert, Union Theological Seminary: Response from Theology
  • Joel E. Anderson – University of Arkansas, Little Rock, Institute on Race and Ethnicity: Response from Public Institutions and the Church
  • Don McLaughlin, North Atlanta Church of Church of Christ: Heuristic Grist & Trajectories for Action  

This Civil Rights session addresses “reparations,” in the context of African American history, through the vantage of a “sermon” by Rabbi Phillip “Flip” Rice from Nashville’s Micah Congregation. For a subject that is typically a non-starter, at best, and a conversation closer, at least, Rabbi Rice’s oration uniquely opens doors and sets forth possibilities. Objective analysis from homiletics, theology, civil rights, and public institutions and the church will critically explore the very topic the sermon calls for. Time will be reserved for interaction among panelists and audience and close with an assessment of “heuristic grist” eyeing trajectories for further study and action.

Health Sciences

“Integrating Faith into Health Sciences Curricula” - Swang Center 112

Hope A. Martin, Abilene Christian University, Convener?

  • Marcia R. Straughn, Abilene Christian University, “Faith and Affective Learning in Health Sciences Programs”
  • Leah I. Fullman, Faulkner University, “Unlocking the Cage: An Apology for Health Sciences Programs and Biblical Principles”
  • Joseph E. Deweese, Lipsocmb University, “Applied Christian Values in Pharmacy: A Longitudinal Course in Values, Ethics and Compassion”
  • Ruth Corey, Lipscomb University, “The Experiences of Nurse Practitioners When Communicating Bad News to Cancer Patients”

A unique opportunity of the Health Sciences existing in Christian universities is the ability to unapologetically incorporate Christian values, beliefs, and worldviews into curricula. There is potential and power in this opportunity to train students to care for others while living out their faith. This is the first session in the history of the CSC for the Health Sciences to come together and share ideas for intentionally integrating Faith into Health Science based curricula. Two intentional faith-based approaches to delivering content in the Health Sciences and a qualitative study regarding delivering bad news to patients will be discussed.

Honors College

“‘To Whom Honor is Due’: Teaching Honors Students to Become the Next Generation of Leaders” - Swang Center 232

Joshua S. Fullman, Faulkner University and Andrew Jacobs, Faulkner University, Co-Conveners

  • W. Brett Wiley, Mount Vernon Nazarene University, “Complexity as a Means to Emergence in Honors Education.”
  • Stacy L. Patty, Lubbock Christian University, “Experiential and Interdisciplinary Learning for Leadership Development.”
  • Jonathan Thorndike, Belmont University, “Revising the Honors Curriculum for the 21st Century.”
  • Paul Prill, Lipscomb University, “Magis: Jesus, Ignatius, and Honors Education at Lipscomb”

The honors program or college is uniquely situated to provide students with the challenges of an ethically-informed and intellectually-rigorous experience on a model of classical and/or innovative learning. This panel seeks to understand how honors programs in Christian colleges and universities can best serve the academically-advanced and how those students can develop their God-given talents to lead in the future. Whether through a tutorial system or a Great Books curriculum, partnering with merit societies, or through community service, we will explore the philosophical, pedagogical, and theological approaches to constructing a meaningful honors experience.

Interdisciplinary Studies

“A Town Hall Conversation on Immigration” - Ezell Center 363

L. Randolph Lowry, Lipscomb University, Convener

  • James O. Browning, United States District Judge, District of New Mexico
  • Mark Hamilton, Abilene Christian University
  • Jim Gash, Pepperdine University
  • Kristine LaLonde, Lipscomb University
  • Renata Soto, Conexión Américas, Co-Founder and Executive Director

The CSC this year introduces a town hall session to seek insights on the nation’s toughest issues. This year’s town hall intends to stimulate and advance important conversations on immigration, a national discourse that has been politicized and broken.

Modeling multidisciplinary scholarship, civil dialogue and honest exchange this session will begin with conversation between Lipscomb President L. Randolph Lowry and James O. Browning, United States District Judge, District of New Mexico. Others included in the developing conversation will be Old Testament scholar Mark Hamilton whose recent research and writing includes an examination of biblical texts’ understanding of Israel as a migrant people and a host of migrants; Jim Gash, Professor of Law at Pepperdine University and director of their global justice program, rounds out the initial conversationalists; Kristine LaLonde, who worked as chief innovation officer for the Metropolitan Government of Nashville and Davidson County and helped launch Lipscomb's School of Public Policy, and Renata Soto, co-founder and executive director of Conexión Américas, whose work recognizes the vibrant presence and positive impact immigrants and refugees have made in the Nashville community.

New Testament

“Bryson and Philodemus: Two Perspective on Household Management” - Ezell Center 211

Kindalee Pfremmer De LongPepperdine University, Convener

  • John T. Fitzgerald, University of Notre Dame, Presenter
  • Trevor W. Thompson, University of Chicago and Calvin College, Respondent
  • Richard A. Wright, Abilene Christian University, Respondent

The earliest Greek economic theorists were concerned primarily with the management of the people and property that comprised a private household (oikos), though they occasionally also gave attention to the economy of the polis. The focus on the household is seen, for example, in Xenophon’s famous Oeconomicus, and he was followed in this regard by the Epicurean philosopher Philodemus (On the Household Economy), and the Neopythagorean philosopher Bryson (Oikonomikos Logos = Management of the Estate). This paper will compare and contrast the perspectives of Bryson and Philodemus on the topic of household management.

Politics and Faith

“Intersections of faith and politics: From the contours of the First Amendment to the role of religious bias in US presidential elections” - Swang Center 234 

Susan Turner Haynes, Lipscomb University, Convener

  • Brett Benson, Vanderbilt University, “Expressing Bias Through ‘Cover’ Issues”
  • Rustin Suray, University of Mississippi, “An Analysis of External Aid and Internal Armed Conflict”
  • Mark Royce, George Mason University, “Christian Democracy and National Security: The Theory and Practice of Reformed Catholicism on Questions of State Power and Violence”
  • Brad Reid, Lipscomb University, “The First Amendment and Freedom of Religion”

While the separation of church and state is often perceived as a bedrock of American democracy, it is oftentimes impossible to discuss the state without reference to the church. This is true in America as elsewhere, where religion, and Christianity in particular, has a dramatic influence on voters as well as their leaders. In this session, panelists will discuss some of the more well known intersections of faith and politics, such as the contours of the First Amendment in the US Constitution, as well as some of the lesser known tensions, such as the role of religious bias in US presidential elections. Outside the US, panelists will discuss the role of reformist, lay Catholicism in the resurrection of postwar Europe, and the role of the Soviet Collapse in domestic instability abroad. 

Practical Theology

“Current Trends in Homiletics: Conversations in Theory and Practice” - Ezell Center 138

Tim SensingAbilene Christian University Graduate School of Theology and Mason LeePrinceton Theological Seminary, Co-Conveners

  • Mason Lee, Princeton Theological Seminary, “Learning to Speak of God: Patience as Method in Homiletical Reasoning”
  • Dr. Patrick Johnson, First Presbyterian Church, Asheville NC, “Preaching With the Choir”
  • Bryan Nash, Lipscomb University, “The Scripture Reading and Sermon as Conversation Partners”
  • Mallory Wyckoff, Lipscomb University, Respondent
  • Naomi Walters, Rochester College, Respondent
  • Becca Kello, Christ Episcopal Church of Bowling Green, Respondent

The field of homiletics is witnessing an eruption of new approaches, foci, and methods.  Claiming its position as a practical theological discipline with renewed interest, the field of homiletics engages a multitude of interdisciplinary partners. The result is a myriad of renewed and novel topics, foci, approaches, and resources for the study, teaching, and faithful practice of preaching.  This session explores these emerging directions by bringing together a diverse collection of homileticians and local practitioners to consider and discuss these trends and their influence and potential for the practice of preaching.

Sola Scripture and Prima Scriptura

“Sola Scriptura and Prima Scriptura: The Tension and Cohesion of Scripture and Community,” Section I Ezell Center 263

Daniel Oden, Harding University, J. David StarkFaulkner University, and Kevin YoungbloodHarding University, Co-Conveners

  • Daniel Oden and Kevin Youngblood, Harding University, “Redemption, Revelation, and Recital: Creedal Expressions of Faith in the Hebrew Bible”
  • J. David Stark, Faulkner University, “The Inprismed Word: Early Christian Beliefs, Dispositions, and Their Impact on Paul’s Quotations of Jewish Scripture in 1 Corinthians 15”
  • Scott Adair, Harding University, “Reading Scripture Baptismally”
  • Keith Stanglin, Austin Graduate School of Theology, “The Rule of Faith as Hermeneutic”

The possibility of establishing sustainable Christian unity on the basis of Scripture alone has been repeatedly undermined by the extreme interpretive pluralism generated by Protestantism’s view(s) of biblical authority. Last year’s session was devoted to Keith Stanglin’s recognition of the need to give more thoughtful expression to the nature of revelation by clarifying the roles played by community and creed in expressing Christian unity. This year's sessions begin a careful consideration of the relationship between the divine authority vested in Scripture and Christian community. The generative sessions explore that relationship through hermeneutical, historical, and theological models that seek to take seriously both prima scriptura and communio sanctorum as modes of divine authority.

Teaching, Learning and Technology

“From Oddity to Ubiquitous: Looking Back at our Experiences Teaching and Learning with Technology” - Swang Center 110

Melinda Thompson, Abilene Christian University, and Peter Williams, Abilene Christian University, Co-Conveners

  • Sarah Gibson, Lipscomb University
  • Colleen Halupa, East Texas Baptist University
  • Chris Simmons, Lipscomb University
  • Chris Rosser, Oklahoma Christian University
  • Jessica Smith, Abilene Christian University

Panelists look back at challenges and discoveries made in technology-mediated teaching and learning and discuss how what was once new and perhaps opposed by the status quo eventually became a new normal in teaching and learning.

Session 2: Wednesday June 6, 1:00 – 2:30 p.m.

American Religions

“'De-Americanizing World Vision’: How Internationalization Reshaped Christian Mission in the 1970s" - Ezell Center 205

Corey J. MarkumFreed-Hardeman University, Convener

  • Joshua Ward Jeffery, University of Tennessee—Knoxville, “‘Christian Principles in the New World Order’: The League of Nations Controversy and the Stone-Campbell Movement”
  • Daniel Overton, Freed-Hardeman University, “Pacifism after Pearl Harbor: Foy E. Wallace Jr. Changes His Mind”
  • David R. Swartz, Asbury University, “How Internationalization Reshaped Christian Mission in the 1970s”
  • Chip Kooi, Oklahoma Christian University, Respondent

Wartime environments have long provided a crucible for realignments and shifts in American Christian thought and practice. This session explores three pivotal moments of evolution across the twentieth century: further branching within the Stone-Campbell movement over globalism in the wake of WWI; Foy Wallace’s militarist transformation after Pearl Harbor and the consequences for Churches of Christ; and the shift toward internationalist-oriented missions pursued by World Vision in the Vietnam era and beyond.

Business, Computing and Engineering

“Property and Law” - Swang Center 230

Brad Reid, Lipscomb University, Convener

  • Greg Bonadies, Resurrect, LLC, “Property Rules:  Ideas, Incentives, Production, and Prosperity”
  • Clifford Anderson, Vanderbilt University “Geographical Indication and Religious Authenticity”
  • Brad Reid, Lipscomb University, “The Foundations of the US Legal System”
  • Brad Reid, Lipscomb University, “Is the Constitution a Sponge or a Stone?”

Faculty scholars in business often face challenges in the areas of property and the law.  This session includes a wide range of papers that address the intersection of the economic aspects of property, the US legal system, ‘geographic indication’ (such as champagne from France) and religious authenticity.

Civil Rights

“Fifty Years Later: African American Churches and Social Justice” - Swang Center 232

Joel E. Anderson, University of Arkansas, Little Rock, Institute on Race and Ethnicity, Convener

  • Steven Tramel Gaines, University of Memphis and Cordova Church of Christ, Memphis, TN, “#BlackLivesMatter in The Christian Chronicle”
  • Kenneth Gilmore, Navarro College and Southwestern Christian College, “Developing A Public Theology in African American Churches of Christ.”
  • Gary Selby, Emmanuel Christian Seminary, Milligan College, “‘For the Least of These’”: The Scandal of Poverty in the World House”
  • Michelle D. Steele, Lipscomb University, “De-Coding and Working Within the African American Community”

This year marks the 50th anniversary of the assassination of Dr. King. During his short life, he preached about the systemic conditions in America that forced African Americans to contend daily with poverty and injustice. He and others marched to bring light to these matters. However, today, in many ways, the fight for equality and justice continues. This session explores the call of the (African American) Churches of Christ in engaging the community around issues of social justice and equality and makes recommendations for engagement and building real relationships that can propel and sustain communities will be discussed.

Film Studies

“21st Century Identity Politics and American Sci-Fi and Fantasy Films” - Swang Center 234

Joi Carr, Pepperdine University, Convener

  • Katherine Frye, Pepperdine University, “Nature Deficit-Disorder and Pixar’s WALL-E
  • Ian Aipperspach, Lubbock Christian University, “To Boldly Go Where No One Has Gone Before’: Sociopolitical, Ideological and Star Trek “Reboot” Franchise”
  • Leslie Reed, Abilene Christian University, “Presentation Title: Insects, Identity, and the De-individualization of the Other: The Language of Xenophobia in Ender’s Game and Starship Troopers

Filmmakers often use science fiction and fantasy films to explore sociopolitical and ideological issues that would otherwise alienate audiences. The proliferation of such films point to a particular 21st century zeitgeist. This panel seeks to uncover the range and complexity of the issues examined in 21st century American films. This panel will explore critical perspectives that interrogate issues of national identity, race, class, and gender, through formal analysis, literary analysis, and genre studies.

Future of Higher Education

“The Lofty Vision of Vocation: An Important Way to Enrich our Students, Our Curricula, and Our Institutions” - Ezell Center 109

John BartonPepperdine University, Convener

  • Amy Santas, Associate Professor of Biology, Muskingum University
  • John Barton, Director, Pepperdine University Center for Faith and Learning
  • Stephanie Steiert, Staff Director for Pathways to Purpose, Spring Hill College
  • David Cunningham, Hope College and Network for Vocation in Undergraduate Education (NetVUE) for the Council of Independence Colleges

The Network for Vocation in Undergraduate Education (NetVUE) is transforming colleges and universities across the country. Representatives from three of the more than 200 NetVUE member institutions—Muskingum University, Pepperdine University, and Spring Hill College—will explain how NetVUE, with its careful attention to the theme of vocation, enriches their students, their curricula, and indeed, their institutions.

“Presidents' Session: ‘The Era of Trump – Crises and Opportunities for Christian Higher Education’” - Ezell Center 136

Trace Hebert, Lipscomb University, Convener

  • L. Randolph Lowry, President, Lipscomb University
  • Michael F. Adams, Chancellor Pepperdine University
  • Brian Stogner, President, Rochester College
  • Bruce D. McLarty, President, Harding University
  • David R. Shannon, President, Freed-Hardeman University
  • Michael D. Williams, President, Faulkner University

In an era of great social uneasiness, protests, polarization, mistrust of authority, fake news, leadership failures, and promotion of political agendas through chaotic environments, how might a Christian university stand in the societal gap by teaching and modeling authentic leadership for the world?  In this session, university presidents explore how Christian higher education can prepare students to be voices of authenticity and reason in the midst of a polarized society.

Health Sciences

“Discovery in the Sciences: Research Updates in Basic and Biomedical Sciences” Session I - PSRC 106 (Pharmaceutical Sciences Training Laboratory)

Joseph E. Deweese, Lipscomb University, Convener

  • Beth Conway, Lipscomb University, Biology (Hannah Stephen, Haley St. John, co-authors), “Neprilysin Methylation in Breast Cancer”
  • Caleb Kersey, Freed-Hardeman University, Biological, Physical, and Human Sciences (Darren Heintzman and C. Korsi Dumenyo, co-authors), “A putative Sodium Sulfate Symporter Mutant of Pectobacterium carotovorum has Altered Virulence Characteristics”
  • Joseph E. Deweese, Lipscomb University, Pharmacy (Cole A. Fief and Renee A. Menzie, co-authors), “Mapping the Interactions and Post-Translational Modifications of Topoisomerase II”

Basic and biomedical science research are critical efforts in our modern era. Discovering the molecular basis of disease and basic molecular processes enable us to develop strategies for more effective therapeutics, pesticides, and other life-improving chemicals. Our commission to “fill the earth and subdue it” (Genesis 1:28) brings with it a great responsibility to be wise and careful stewards of the creation. Further, the recognition that the we can see the eternal attributes of God “in the things that have been made” (Romans 1:20), make our calling as scientists in discovery a valuable and holy calling.

Library Studies

"Libraries and the Future of Reading for Faith and Learning" - Ezell Center 138

Jason Fikes, Abilene Christian University, Convener

  • Carisse Berryhill, University of IL, Urbana-Champaign and Abilene Christian University, "Reading and the education of theological librarians"
  • Douglas Gragg, Harvard Divinity School, "Reading and the work of Christian scholars"
  • John B. Weaver, Abilene Christian University, "Reading and library collection development"
  • M. Patrick Graham, Emory University, Respondent

Contributors to a recent Festschrift [Reading for Faith and Learning (ACU Press, 2017)] for Dr. Pat Graham (Emory University) will explore the future of the discipline of reading and especially the role of libraries and librarians in cultivating this practice and the materials that support it. Panelists will review the Festschrift and reflect on changing patterns of reading in university/seminary courses and other scholarly activities, as well as the implications of these changes for teaching, librarianship, and publishing. Participants, including Dr. Graham, will seek to provide descriptions of educational cultures that support reading for faith and learning.

Missional Theology and World Christianity

“Unexpected Ecumenism: Two Growing Worldwide Communions in Dialogue” - Ezell Center 234

       Gary HollowayWorld Convention and Jeremy HegiBoston University, Co-Conveners

  • Gary Holloway, World Convention
  • Tony Richie, Church of God Theological Seminary, Panelist
  • Daniel Tomberlin, Church of God, Cleveland, TN, Panelist
  • John Mark Hicks, Lipscomb University, Panelist
  • Mark Weedman, Johnson University, Panelist

As Churches of Christ and Churches of God have enjoyed an explosion of growth in the Global South during the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, ecumenical activity among these congregations has emerged in unexpected places that would have surprised the North American forebears of these respective traditions. This panel explores the growth and ecumenical activity of these two Christian traditions in the Global South. In doing so, it will help foster an appreciative dialogue between Churches of Christ and Churches of God (Cleveland, TN) as both traditions seek to learn from the experience of the other.

Philosophy

“Philosophy and the Church” - Ezell Center 211

Christopher A. Shrock, Ohio Valley University, Convener

  • Blake McAllister, Hillsdale College, “Perspectives on the Problem of Evil:  The Need for Theodicy”
  • Beau Branson, Brescia University, “The Forgotten Monarchy of the Father in Analytic Discussions of the Trinity”
  • Derek Estes, Abilene Christian University, “On Religious Epistemology in the Churches of Christ”

Philosophy provides a framework for interpreting religious experience and God’s revelation, draws out the implications of Scripture for belief and practice, and defends the faith through discourse and argument. This year’s session on Philosophy and the Church features papers in each of these veins: religious epistemology, analytic theology, and apologetics. Collectively, the presentations illustrate the necessity and value of philosophical activity for the ecclesial community as well as the growing philosophical fellowship in today’s Stone-Campbell Movement.

Roberts’ Lecture in Old Testament Studies

The Fourth Annual J.J.M. Roberts Lecture in Old Testament Studies: “The ‘Gender Gap’: Textual and Archaeological Images of Israelite Women” - Ezell Center 241 (Chapel)

      Carol Lyons Meyers, Duke University, Emerita

  • Mark Hamilton, Abilene Christian University, Mark Sneed, Lubbock Christian University, Rick Marrs, Pepperdine University, Conveners
  • Carol Lyons Meyers, Duke University, Emerita, "The 'Gender Gap': Textual and Archaeological Images of Israelite Women"
  • Noemí Palomares, Boston College, Respondent
  • Mark Hamilton, Abilene Christian University, Respondent
  • J.J.M. Roberts, Princeton Theological Seminary, Emeritus, Respondent

The study of women in several disciplines reveals a disjunction between the images in normative texts and the information garnered from other sources. The social reality of women’s lives is thus best reconstructed using information from a variety of sources. For ancient Israel, archaeology is the main alternative source. Then the archaeological data require interpretation that engages social science disciplines. Together, they provide a glimpse of the daily lives of ordinary women. Examining several aspects of daily lives shows a more balanced situation of gendered power than is implied in many biblical texts. Meyers will present her paper in 45 minutes, leaving significant time for response and discussion.

Sola Scriptura and Prima Scriptura

“Sola Scriptura and Prima Scriptura: The Tension and Cohesion of Scripture and Community” Section II Ezell Center 263

Daniel Oden, Harding UniversityJ. David StarkFaulkner University, and Kevin YoungbloodHarding University, Co-Conveners

  • Stephen Lawson, St. Louis University, “The Primitivist Impulse Historically and Critically Considered”
  • Lauren Smelser White, Lipscomb University, “On Canon and Community: Attending to Inspired Bodies”
  • Jeff Cary, Lubbock Christian University, “Ecumenical Hermeneutics: Prima Scripture, Visible Unity and Authority”

The possibility of establishing sustainable Christian unity on the basis of Scripture alone has been repeatedly undermined by the extreme interpretive pluralism generated by Protestantism’s view(s) of biblical authority. Last year’s session was devoted to Keith Stanglin’s recognition of the need to give more thoughtful expression to the nature of revelation by clarifying the roles played by community and creed in expressing Christian unity. This year's sessions begin a careful consideration of the relationship between the divine authority vested in Scripture and Christian community. The generative sessions explore that relationship through hermeneutical, historical, and theological models that seek to take seriously both prima scriptura and communio sanctorum as modes of divine authority.

Theology

Canonical Theism after Ten Years" - Ezell Center 107

       Mark PowellHarding School of Theology, Convener

  • Mark Powell, Harding School of Theology, “Canonical Theism and the Stone-Campbell Movement”
  • Fred Aquino, Abilene Christian University, “Canonical Theism and Teaching Systematic Theology”
  • Carson E. Reed, Abilene Christian University, “Canonical Theism and Teaching Practical Theology”
  • Ben Bruner, Harding University, “Canonical Theism and the Faith and Science Dialogue”

Ten years ago Eerdmans released Canonical Theism: A Proposal for Theology and the Church, a collection of essays influenced by the work of William J. Abraham and promoting fresh directions for contemporary theology.  In this session two of the book’s contributors and two other scholars critically reflect on the importance of Canonical Theism for the Stone-Campbell Movement and for scholarly work in various academic disciplines like systematic theology, practical theology, and the natural sciences (for the faith and science dialogue).  A time for questions and discussion will follow the presentations.  

Session 3: Wednesday June 6, 2:45 – 4:15 p.m.

Business, Computing and Engineering

“Corporate Social Responsibility and Leadership” - Swang Center 112

Dennis MarquardtAbilene Christian University, Convener

  • Orneita Burton, Abilene Christian University, “Re-engineering Corporate Social Responsibility and Sustainability in the Justice System”
  • Marguerite Cronk, Harding University, “Corporate Social Responsibility in the Big Data Arena”
  • N. Lamar Reinsch, Lubbock Christian University, “Seeing Through Failure: Studying Excellent Leadership in the Midst of Defeat” 
  • Andy Borchers, Lipscomb University, “VW Diesel Scandal” (Pecha Kucha)
  • Dennis Marquardt, Abilene Christian University, “Including the Outsider:  How Leader Other Group Orientation Relates to Ethical Leadership and Important Work Outcomes” (Pecha Kucha)

Corporate Social Responsibility and Leadership are long-standing topics for Christian business faculty. Organizations increasingly face challenges as they manage to the 3 P’s (People, Profit and Planet). Christian leaders are especially vexed in balancing their faith with the rough and tumble world of markets. Further, the growth of “big data” introduces even greater challenges to leaders and organizations. This session features two Pecha Kucha presentations – 20 slides delivered in 20 seconds each.

Christianity, Literature and Language

“Biblical Impressions and Themes in Secular Literature” - Swang Center 232

Ronna Privett, Lubbock Christian University, Convener

  • Nathan Shank, Oklahoma Christian University, “Style Is Work: The Reader’s Role in Representation from Paul Auster to The Binding of Isaac”
  • Nancy Shankle Jordan, Louisiana State University – Shreveport, “‘The Awful Grace of God’ in William Kent Krueger’s Ordinary Grace: A Novel
  • Carole Carroll, Lubbock Christian University, “‘O’ the Horror’: Stephen King and a Biblical God”

Although our western world has become increasingly critical of religion, biblical themes and messages that reflect a Christian worldview are not uncommon in literature. From murder mysteries to coming-of-age to horror stories, our presenters will discuss ways literature often reflects biblical concepts, looking specifically at texts that would not typically fit under the label “Christian Literature,” and we will explore the ramifications of these secular/religious works.

Church and the Academy

“Bridging the Divide: Addressing the Gap between the Church and the Academy” - Swang Center 234

Brandon PierceStamford Church of Christ, Stamford CT, and Paul WatsonCole Mill Road Church of Christ, Durham NC, Co-Conveners

  • Eddie Sharp, University Avenue Church of Christ, “Navigating Being Church: The Place of Scholarship in the Stability of the Church”
  • Patrick Messer, First Plymouth Church, Lincoln NE, “Dear Seminary”
  • Sara Barton, Pepperdine University, “University Spiritual Formation and the Importance of Ecclesial Relationships”
  • Carson E. Reed, Abilene Christian University, Respondent

The fissures that define our social landscape are often reflected in the many apparent divisions between our churches and seminaries. While local ecclesial bodies tend toward theological simplicity and stability, the intellectual openness at the core of academic life pushes boundaries and challenges stasis. The unique values and ideas that have shaped and defined Churches of Christ further complicate this relationship. The papers in this session continue our ongoing conversation about the gap between our churches and our academies through critical evaluation and practical suggestions for bringing these two vital bodies together.

Civil Rights

“Building Racial Bridges and Seeking Racial Understanding: Uncovering the Pervasiveness of White Supremacy” - Ezell Center 109

William Lofton TurnerLipscomb University, Convener

  • Lean’tin Bracks, Fisk University
  • Patricia Brock, American Baptist College
  • Heather Finch, Belmont University
  • Chris Gonzalez, Lipscomb University
  • William Green, American Baptist College
  • Amy Hodges Hamilton, Belmont University
  • Eric Holt, Belmont University
  • Richard T. Hughes, Lipscomb University
  • Kathy Mowry, Trevecca Nazarene University
  • Elizabeth Nunley, Trevecca Nazarene University
  • Shelia Peters, Fisk University
  • Kimberly Reed, Lipscomb University
  • Lakisha Simmons, Belmont University
  • Davie Tucker, American Baptist College

Scholars from five Nashville faith-based universities, two predominately Black and three predominately White, are meeting monthly to help equip faculty leaders to understand the subtle pervasiveness of White supremacist ideology in everyday life and culture. The primary goal is to identify and expose conscious and unconscious White supremacist thinking, and then develop long range strategies for intentionally eradicating that thinking from our lives and world views. Participants will share their personal stories of how White supremacy has touched their lives. 

Health Sciences

“Discovery in the Sciences: Research Updates in Basic and Biomedical Sciences” Session II - PSRC 106 (Pharmaceutical Sciences Training Laboratory)

Joseph E. Deweese, Lipscomb University, Convener

  • T. Brian Cavitt, Lipscomb University, Chemistry and Biochemistry (Jasmine G. Carlisle, Verena N. Ghebranious, D. Spencer Oskin, Emily B. Henry, and Wenting Wei, co-authors), “Comprehensive Surface Free Energy Analyses to Inhibit Biofilm Formation”
  • T. L. Wallace, Lipscomb University, Computing & Technology, “Recent Progress on Distributions of Random Mutation Sequences”
  • Salvador Cordova, Feed My Sheep Foundation (Joseph E. Deweese, John Sanford, co-authors), Exploring the Origin of Nylonases”

Exploration of the natural world around us brings us to a sense of awe and wonder. The details and inner workings of the various biochemical systems we find often leads us to more questions than answers. However, with each new question, doors of opportunity open that enable us to continue investigation. In a sense, our discoveries are really the unveiling of what God has already done and provides a glimpse of God’s “Divine nature” (Romans 1:20). In examining the molecular details of life, we find that “what is seen was not made out of things that are visible” (Hebrews 11:3).

Interdisciplinary Studies

“Major Book Review: Monte Cox, Significant Others: Understanding Our Non-Christian Neighbors (Leafwood, 2017)” - Ezell Center 107

       John Barton, Pepperdine University, Convener

  • Dr. Nahed Artoul Zehr, Faith & Culture Center, Nashville ,TN, Reviewer
  • Rabbi Philip “Flip” Rice, Congregation Micah, Nashville, TN, Reviewer
  • Josh Graves, Otter Creek Church, Nashville, TN, Reviewer
  • Monte Cox, Harding University, Respondent

How should Christians engage religious others? A lack of understanding of our non-Christian global neighbors is often a major barrier to answering that question well. To address this problem, Monte Cox, Dean of the College of Bible and Ministry at Harding University, offers his new book, Significant Others: Understanding Our Non-Christian Neighbors. In this session, Cox will interact with Christian and non-Christian reviewers and discuss the book's content and significance for understanding each other.

Journalism

“What it Means to be an American in the Current Era of Change and How Do We Talk About it?: The Roles of Civic Organizations, Faith Based Institutions and their Scholars” - Ezell Center 138

Michael A. Anastasi, USA TODAY and The Tennessean, Convener

  • Laura H. Berlind, Founding Executive Director, The Sycamore Institute
  • Cathy Cate, Executive Director, Leadership Tennessee
  • David Plazas, Opinion and Engagement Director, USA TODAY
  • Michael A. Anastasi, Vice President, USA TODAY and Editor, The Tennessean

With the country at a crossroads, this interactive panel examines the rapidly changing dynamics in our national conversation and the roles played by civic institutions, faith-based universities and their scholars. Can we return to a time when we are able to speak with those with whom we disagree civilly and respectfully? Was there even such a time? How does a country that celebrates its diversity get along in the decades ahead? Come with your thoughts on this important topic. Audience participation is encouraged.

Missional Theology and World Christianity

“Missional. Monastic. Restorationist?” - Ezell Center 136

Kent SmithAbilene Christian University and Greg McKinzieFuller Theological Seminary, Co-Conveners

  • Alden Bass, Oklahoma Christian University, “Radical and Restorationist: Stone-Campbell Resources for Christian Intentional Community”
  • Charles Moore, The Mount Community (Bruderhof), Esopus, NY, “Radical, Communal, Bearing Witness: The Church as God’s Mission in Bruderhof Perspective and Practice”
  • Elaine Heath, Duke Divinity School, Respondent

Elaine Heath and Larry Duggins’s 2014 book Missional. Monastic. Mainline: A Guide to Starting Missional Micro-Communities in Historically Mainline Traditions is this session’s point of departure. Participants will address the book’s concerns from within distinct restorationist traditions, exploring their unique challenges and opportunities in light of those identified by Heath and Duggins. Elaine Heath will respond.

New Testament

“Material Culture and the Gospel of Mark” - Ezell Center 205

John T. Fitzgerald, University of Notre Dame, Convener

  • Cilliers Breytenbach, Humboldt-Universitat zu Berlin, “Material Culture and the Reading of Mark,” Presentation
  • Carl Holladay, Candler School of Theology, Emory University, Respondent

The interpretation of the New Testament involves a number of concerns. Scholarship has often focused on philology, history, and hermeneutical theories as means for reading the biblical texts effectively. One of the areas that has often been neglected is material culture. Cilliers Breytenbach, the Malherbe lecturer for this year, is a leading expert on the relationship between material culture and New Testament texts. This session will be devoted to his current work on the gospel of Mark. It will focus both on the value of material culture for understanding the biblical text and on Mark. Following Holladay’s response time will be reserved for discussion.

Sports and Religion

“Coming To: Concussion, Sports, and Christianity” - Ezell Center 211

Steven BonnerLipscomb University, Convener

  • Joshua Fleer, Oakland University, Sports History
  • Adam Metz, Alum Creek Church, Lewis Center, Ohio, Theology of Sport
  • Matthew Ruiz, Lipscomb University, Sports Psychology

Sport is a lucrative enterprise accounting for billions of dollars in revenue annually. Athletes at all levels of competition and in all sports, sustain injury. This is the acceptable risk one undertakes to participate. However, recent technological advances, research, and media attention have shined a collective spotlight on the significant damage athletes have sustained through concussions. Increasingly, stories of brain damaged athletes determined post-mortem, beg questions of sustainability of these sports in their current state. Concerned voices are emerging from all corners of the sports world, but eerily absent is the voice of the Christian church. This session seeks to step into that silence with critical reflection on this growing concern and the apparent Christian apathy.

Theology

“Towards a Theology of Scripture” - Ezell Center 234

       Frederick AquinoAbilene Christian University, Convener

  • Noemí Palomares, Boston College, “Biblical Considerations”
  • Brad East, Abilene Christian University, “Ecclesiological Considerations”
  • Mark Wiebe, Lubbock Christian University, “Christological Considerations”
  • Frederick Aquino, Abilene Christian University, “Philosophical Considerations”

This session will focus on the constructive task of developing a theology of scripture. Towards this end, it will draw insights from biblical studies, theology, and philosophy and explore how insights from these disciplines shape the constructive task of forming a theology of scripture. The session will include four brief presentations, a discussion among the presenters, and questions from the audience.

Theology and the Arts

“The History of Theopoetics, a Democratization of God-talk in Rubem Alves, the Poetry and Music of Johnny Cash, and a Response from Theology” - Swang Center 230

Micki Pulleyking, Missouri State University, Convener

  • Victor L. Hunter, South Broadway Christian Church (Disciples of Christ), Denver, Colorado, “Rubem Alves and Theopoetics”
  • Micki Pulleyking, Missouri State University, “Johnny Cash: A Courageous Wrestling with Questions of the Divine, Desire, and Death”
  • Keegan Osinski, Vanderbilt University, Respondent from Radical Theology

Theopoetics is the intersection of justice, spirituality, imagination, the arts, and embodiment. Theopoetics suggests people can seek God through poetic articulations of their lived (“embodied”) experiences: both the divine and the real are mysterious and irreducible to literalist dogmas or scientific proofs. There are many ways of exploring theopoetics, combining elements of poetry, process theology, narrative theology, and postmodern philosophy. By looking at the theopoetics of Rubem Alves and listening to the poetry of Johnny Cash, this session will focus on eternal truths of the imagination—humans seeking a glimpse of the divine.  

Session 4: Thursday June 7, 9:00 – 10:30 a.m.

American Religions

“Premillennialism in Churches of Christ” - Ezell Center 207

Scott Billingsley, University of North Carolina, Pembroke, Convener

  • Scott T. Prather, Baylor University, “Contending for the Truth: Premillennialism, churches of Christ, and the Gospel Advocate”
  • Phil Slate, Harding School of Theology, “The Effects of Premillennial Eschatology on Missions by Churches of Christ in North America: 1892-1970”
  • Hans J. Rollmann, Memorial University of Newfoundland, “Robert Henry Boll and the Nashville Bible School”
  • John Mark Hicks, Lipscomb University

The onset of World War I sparked increased interest in and debate about premillennialism as many people came to believe that this war marked the beginning of the end times. By the 1920s, it was a major topic of discussion in churches of Christ. Discussants on this panel examine some of the major arguments, proponents, and effects of these debates during the interwar years.

Business, Computing and Engineering

“Emerging Spiritual Challenges in the “Gig Economy” - Swang Center 232

N. Lamar Reinsch, Lubbock Christian University, Convener

  • Joe F. Alexander, Belmont University
  • Christopher M. Davis, Harding University
  • Clyde D. Neff, Lubbock Christian University
  • Suzanne M. Sager, Lipscomb University
  • N. Lamar Reinsch, Lubbock Christian University

What is the “gig economy” (or the “platform economy” or the “sharing economy”)? What challenges does it pose for workers, managers, and organizations? Do the challenges have spiritual dimensions? More specifically, what challenges does the gig economy pose for Christian college educators in business and other professional fields? The members of this panel do not promise definitive answers to such questions—but they do promise, as Business professors, chairs, and deans, to share materials, offer their considered opinions, and raise additional questions.

Christianity, Literature and Language

“Reading Tracy K. Smith’s Wade in the Water: A Poetry Evangelist Revealed” - Ezell Center 205

Susan Blassingame, Lubbock Christian University, Convener

  • Albert Haley, Abilene Christian University
  • John Struloeff, Pepperdine University
  • Nancy Shankle Jordan, Louisiana State University-Shreveport
  • Tracy K. Smith, Princeton University, Respondent

Recently named the 2017-18 U.S. Poet Laureate, Tracy K. Smith said that she wanted to take poetry to the people and communities that she remembered as a child when she was first introduced to Emily Dickinson and the beauty and power of language. Smith’s work examines history, culture, and spirituality, with an eye toward the questions and tensions that define our current time. The panelists will review her most recent collection, Wade in the Water, within these larger contexts. Smith will join the panelists for a Q&A and discussion.

Early Career Scholars in Theological Disciplines

“Doing Religious Scholarship in an Unjust World: A Roundtable Conversation” - Ezell Center 109

Andrew Krinks, Vanderbilt University, Convener

  • Hilary Scarsella, Vanderbilt University
  • Rima Vesely-Flad, Warren Wilson College
  • Stanley Talbert, Union Theological Seminary
  • Molefi Kete Asante, Temple University
  • Leo Guardado, Fordham University
  • Amy Steele, Vanderbilt University

We live in a time in which injustice wreaks havoc across the globe. And yet, widespread movements for social justice are everywhere emerging and building to resist and transform injustice. People of faith populate both movements for justice and the masses of people who actively or tacitly endorse unjust systems. How does the religious scholar help realize God’s desire for justice? Participants in this roundtable conversation will explore the roles of the religious scholar in an unjust world by addressing issues of scholarly accountability, the relationship between religious scholars and movements for social justice, and insights on scholarship and activism.

Gender Studies

“Creating Space for LGBTQ Persons in Christian Community” - Swang Center 102

Lynette Sharp PenyaAbilene Christian University, Convener

  • Chris Rosser & Tamie Willis, Oklahoma Christian University, “Safe at Home: Co-curricular Spaces for Generative, (un)Safe Conversations”
  • Paul Prill, Lipscomb University, “LGBTQ Students at Faith-Based Colleges and Universities”
  • Ken Cukrowski, Abilene Christian University, “Thinking Theologically about Same Sex Activity: Ten Hermeneutical Lenses”
  • Don McLaughlin, North Atlanta Church of Christ, Atlanta, GA, Respondent.

This panel explores ways in which Christian institutions, including congregations and private colleges and universities, have responded to, and should respond to increasing numbers of individuals who claim an LGBTQ identity. Panelists will discuss ways to enhance inclusivity with scripture, policy, language, and the use of physical resources.

Health Sciences

Health Care for Unique and Underserved Populations” - Swang Center 230

Scott Weston, Harding University, Convener

  • Kam Nola, Lipscomb University, Faith Perspectives in Service to the Vulnerable Population
  • Chelsia Harris, Lipscomb University, Compassion Fatigue Is Crippling Healthcare: Is Daily Spiritual Experiences the Antidote
  • Scott Weston, Harding University, Holistic End of Life Care
  • Mendy McClelland, Harding University, Health Care for Unique & Underserved Populations

Providing health care to unique and underserved populations of patients presents a host of challenges for health care workers. Some of these challenges include understanding how socioeconomic status and health literacy levels impact patients’ ability to access and participate in care, being aware of the dangers of provider burnout, and working with patients and families facing the end of life. This interdisciplinary session will explore how our faith informs our service to vulnerable patient groups and specific challenges facing providers in working with unique and underserved patient populations.

Interdisciplinary Studies

“The Restoration Plea in the Twenty-First Century” - Swang Center 110

Kathy Pulley, Missouri State University, Convener

  • Gregory E. Sterling, Yale Divinity School, “Is Restoration Singular or Plural?”
  • Heather Gorman, Johnson University, Respondent
  • Richard T. Hughes, Lipscomb University, “What Might ‘Restoration’ Possibly Mean in Light of a Pluriform Biblical Text?”
  • Joshua Fleer, Oakland University, Respondent
  • Fred Aquino, Abilene Christian University, “Restoration: Theological and Philosophical Considerations”
  • Mark Wiebe, Lubbock Christian University, Respondent

The Restoration Movement was predicated on the restoration of New Testament Christianity, especially the understanding of the church.  In a number of quarters today, this plea is the subject of debate over the continuing relevance of the Stone-Campbell Movement. This session will explore the Restoration Plea as a principle from the perspectives of the New Testament as it is understood in contemporary biblical scholarship, American church history over the last two hundred years, and contemporary theology. Three senior scholars will present papers and three younger scholars will respond. The session is a sequel to the paper delivered as the Malherbe plenary paper last year.

Missional Theology and World Christianity

“History of Missions in Churches of Christ” - Ezell Center 232

       Frank V. BellizziTexas Tech University, Convener

  • Stephen V. Crowder, Sandia National Laboratories, “The Field is the World: A History of the Canton Mission (1929–1949) of the Churches of Christ”
  • McGarvey Ice, Abilene Christian University, “Hearts Aflame for the Salvation of Israel: The Nashville Churches of Christ Hebrew Mission, 1928–1931”
  • Frank V. Bellizzi, Texas Tech University, “A Christian School in Indian Territory/Oklahoma, 1889–1920: Meta Chestnutt's Appeals to Chickasaw and Choctaw Leaders”
  • James L. Gorman, Johnson University, Respondent

Passages like the Great Commission (Matthew 28:18-20), Paul’s rhetorical questions in Romans 10:14-15— “. . . and how shall they believe in him of whom they have not heard?’’—and the Macedonian Call— “Come over . . . and help us” (Acts 16:9)—have long inspired members of the Churches of Christ to conduct missions. This session will relate some of the stories, as well as the historical significance, of mission efforts conducted in places as different as the Orient, Nashville, and the Chickasaw Nation, among groups as varied as the Chinese, American Jews, and Indians in the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries.

Roberts’ Lecture in Old Testament Studies

“The Old Testament: New Perspectives” - Swang Center 112

Mark Sneed, Lubbock Christian University

  • Ron Clark, Portland Seminary and Agape Church of Christ, Portland, OR, “Your Warriors Will Become Women: the Feminization of Yahweh and Exiles in Ancient Yehud”
  • Kipp Swinney, Baylor University, “When Yahweh Goes to War: The Theological Implications of the Divine Warrior Motif in Prophetic Literature”
  • Jeremy Barrier, Heritage Christian University, “Who Has the Evil Eye? Various Interpretations of Sarai and Hagar in Genesis 12–21”

The papers in this session explore the socio-cultural world of the Hebrew Bible as reflected in particular texts. They explore such topics as divine violence, divine construction of gender, and the evil eye. They reveal the distance between their world and ours, yet attempt to bridge the gap, providing illuminative theological perspective.

Science

“More than Magic: Science, Theology, and Christian Responsibility” - Swang Center 242

Jon H. Lowrance, Lipscomb University, Convener

  • Steve Donaldson, Samford University, Presenter
  • Amanda Boston, Lubbock Christian University, Respondent
  • Daniel Gordon, Lipscomb University, Respondent

According to Arthur C. Clarke, “Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.” As a corollary, we might add that any insufficiently advanced theology is indistinguishable from magic. Thus, because of advances in science and despite advances in theology, there is a tendency to view each as magical. Yet, Christians have an implicit mandate to engage both areas in order to grow more fully into the image of God and to fulfill our responsibility for the general public. Here we consider why this obligation is inadequately discharged and examine the multifaceted approach required to produce theologically and scientifically literate Christians.

Sports and Religion

“Take Me Out to the Ballgame: Baseball and the Liberal Arts Classroom” - Swang Center 238

Willie SteeleLipscomb University, Convener

  • Paul Howard, Oklahoma Christian University, “Baseball in a College Statistic Course”
  • Charles DeMotte, State University of New York Cortland, “Baseball as an Expression of Liberty and Freedom”
  • Joe Price, Whittier College, “The Grace of the Game: An Aesthetic and Theological Appreciation of Baseball”
  • Gary Lindsey, Oklahoma Christian University, Respondent

Jacques Barzun once said, “Whoever wants to know the heart and mind of America had better learn baseball, the rules and realities of the game.” By examining the game’s rich history through various academic disciplines, we can better understand baseball’s role as the National Pastime and find ways to engage students today with our specific fields of study. This panel explores ways teachers from various disciplines have incorporated the game into their pedagogy, bridging the gap between sport and serious scholarship and helping us understand our hearts and minds through “the rules and realities of the game.”

POSTER SESSION  June 7, 2018 Bennett Student Center Upper Level 12:15 pm-1:45 pm 

Chair:  Roger L. Davis,

Leah I. Fullman, Leigh Holley, Marcia R. Straughn, Tamara Baird, Virginia Corey and Jenna Sissom, (Leslie Boiles)

Leslie Boiles, Zac Cox, Robin Parker, Whitney Narramore, Ben Gross, Haley Willett, Lincoln Shade, Kevin Flatt, Mallory Burns, Ankit Patras, Matt Vergne, Mark Naguib, Will Hedges, Alli Dyer, Beshoy Abdelmessih, Zach Fasig, and R. Nathan Daniels

Gracia M. Amaya, Rebecca Durandis, Kahari J. Wines, Arsany A. Abouda, Samuel A. Starks, R. Nathan Daniels, and Klarissa D. Jackson

Chezka Baker, Elizabeth Breeden, Scott Nelson

Session 5: Thursday June 7, 2:00 – 3:30 p.m.

Business, Computing and Engineering

“Marketing Research and Christian Education” - Swang Center 112

Andy Borchers, Lipscomb University, Convener

  • John Crawford, Lipscomb University, “Closing the Church Door”
  • Jared Poole, University of Utah, “Mo’ Faith, Mo’ Problems?” 
  • Christopher M. Davis, Harding University, “Academic Freedom in Business Schools”
  • David Bosch, Boyce College, “Does Entrepreneurial Education Matter? The Impact on Entrepreneurial Intentions at Faith-Based Institutions”

This session includes a collection of papers on various topics.  Two papers focus on Christian education – including topics of academic freedom and entrepreneurial education.  One paper delves into the question of race in management scholarship.  Finally, one paper looks at the potential to use marketing techniques to help struggling churches.

“Personal Development in the Contemporary World” - Swang Center 230

Russell DabbsLubbock Christian University, Convener

  • Kenneth Mayer, Lipscomb University, “Forgiveness in the Age of Social Media” (Pecha Kucha)
  • Kevin Brown, Asbury University,” How Shall We Then Leisure?”
  • Sarah Gibson, Lipscomb University, “Cultivating Curiosity Through Research”
  • Russell Dabbs, Lubbock Christian University, “Virtue Non Est Disputandum?”

This session highlights a number of personal development issues including forgiveness in a social media world, leisure, building curiosity in research and virtue.  This session features one Pecha Kucha presentations – 20 slides delivered in 20 seconds each.

Church and Academy

“The Many Faces of Athens and Jerusalem: The Relationship between the Church and the Academy in Other Ecclesial Bodies” - Ezell Center 107

Brandon PierceStamford Church of Christ, Stamford CT, and Paul WatsonCole Mill Road Church of Christ, Durham NC, Co-Conveners

  • Heather Gorman, Johnson University, “The Church and the Academy in the Christian Churches/Churches of Christ: Antagonistic, Apathetic, or Amicable?”
  • Justin Bronson Barringer, Southern Methodist University, “The Coming Schism: Using the LGBTQ Discussion as a Lens for Understanding Wesleyan/Holiness Ecclesial-Academic Relations”
  • Dale Martin, Yale University, “Pedagogy of the Bible and Episcopalian Education”
  • Richard T. Hughes, Lipscomb University, Respondent

Following upon the ongoing series of discussions about the divide between the church and the academy within Churches of Christ, this session looks beyond our ecclesial body to see how this relationship works, or does not, in other ecclesial bodies. Each presenter speaks from their particular context—Independent Christian Church, Wesleyan/Holiness, and Episcopal—while also drawing from their connections and past involvement with Churches of Christ. By broadening our perspective on this unique relationship we are better able to contextualize and understand our own.

Civil Rights

“Where Do We Go from Here? Racial Reconciliation and Religious Unity” - Ezell Center 109

Tanya Brice, Bowie State University, Convener

  • James L. Gorman, Johnson University, “‘This Revival Cut the Bonds of Many Poor Slaves:’ Evangelical Revivalism and Race Relations”
  • Christopher R. Hutson, Abilene Christian University, “Genesis, Genes, and Jesus: The Role of Religion in the Lynching Culture of ‘Jim Crow’ America”
  • Edward J. Robinson, Southwestern Christian College, “Sweeping this Land for Jesus: Racial Cooperation in the Jim Crow and Civil Rights Eras”
  • Kathy Pulley, Missouri State University, “Two Movements: Civil Rights and the Religious Right, Christian Roots but ‘One in Christ’?” 

In spite of Christian claims that Jesus Christ broke down all potential “race” barriers, it remains an odd reality that the most segregated hour in America is Sunday mornings when Christians worship this Savior. This panel will explore key facets in the story of race and religion in American history up to the present escalating violence and political upheaval. Speaking out of their recent original research and narrating episodes of religious cooperation, the panel will highlight hopeful signs of a better future and suggest constructive ways forward for a Movement committed to genuine unity.

Creative Writing

“The Fiction of Tobias Wolff” - Ezell Center 205

John StruloeffPepperdine University, Convener

  • Terry Engel, Harding University, “Emergent Truth in the Short Fiction of Tobias Wolff: A Stylistic Analysis of the Moment of Epiphany”
  • Steve Weathers, Abilene Christian University, “Dark Allure: Gun Culture in the World of Tobias Wolff”
  • John Struloeff, Pepperdine University, “Spiritual Crisis in the Short Fiction of Tobias Wolff”
  • Tobias Wolff, Stanford University, Respondent

Through the lens of “emergent truth,” this session examines the work of one of the true craftsmen of American short fiction, Tobias Wolff. With clarity and authenticity, Wolff’s stories render the central crises and paradoxes that define our lives.  Through the forge of their defining inner conflicts – and consequential decisions – his characters face the molten core of their lives. This panel will discuss a range of Wolff’s short fiction, including key stories, such as “Hunters in the Snow,” “Bullet in the Brain,” and “A White Bible.”

Everett Ferguson Endowed Lecture in Early Christian Studies

“Everett Ferguson Endowed Lecture in Early Christian Studies” - Ezell Center 241 (Chapel)

Jeff ChildersAbilene Christian UniversityTera HarmonAbilene Christian University, Ron Heine, Northwest Christian University, and Trevor W. ThompsonUniversity of Chicago and Calvin College, Co-Conveners

  • Jeff Childers, Abilene Christian University, Introduction
  • Robin Darling Young, The Catholic University of America, “‘That I May Enter the Temple and Astonish the Jews!’: Early Christians and the Holy of Holies”

The Temple of Jerusalem, despite its destruction in 70 CE, continued to fascinate the early Christian community through its presence in texts of the Hebrew Bible and Septuagint, as well as in Second Temple texts rejected in Judaism but recopied by Christian scribes. Drawing from Philo and Clement, Origen of Alexandria and his followers understood the lasting yet invisible Temple as an instance of the highest contemplation. But with the imperial rebuilding of Jerusalem as a Christian pilgrimage center, and Julian's reputed plans to rebuild the Temple as a rebuke to Christians, the Temple took on a new and more controversial significance. This lecture explores the variety of early Christian construals of the Temple in the fourth century as the place of encounter between God and Israel—both the new and the old.

Film Studies

“‘Get Busy Living or Get Busy Dying’: The Shawshank Redemption and Theological Implications of Freedom” - Ezell Center 207

Joi Carr, Pepperdine University, Convener

  •  Cheryl Slay Carr, Belmont University, “Juxtapositions of Freedom: Your Blues Ain’t Like Mine, or Are They?”
  • Raymond Carr, Pepperdine University, From Shawshank to Redemption and (Re)creation: Human Freedom and the Imago Dei”
  • Stanley Talbert, Union Theological Seminary, “Redemption in Black: An Intertexual and Theological Analysis of The Shawshank Redemption and Black Mirror

This session will explore the theological implications of The Shawshak Redemption (1994, Frank Darabont), with particular attention to the notion of liberation and freedom. This sessions examines  Shawshank’s intertextually with related works of cinema, literature, theology, and/or visual culture.

Gender Studies

“Religious Forces that Construct the Roles that Bind Us” - Ezell Center 234

Suzie MacalusoAbilene Christian University, Convener

  • Tanya Hart, Pepperdine University, “Where were the Women? Inserting Women’s Bodies into the ‘Curse of Ham’ and Constructions of Race in the 17th-19th Century”
  • Susan HaynesSarah Gibson, and Elizabeth Rivera, Lipscomb University, “The Secret Sisterhood of Shame”
  • Ron Clark, Portland Seminary, “The Emerging Truth of #MeToo: Ministry Among Toxic Masculinity, Survivor Stories, and the God Who Hears the Cries of the Vulnerable”
  • Lynette Sharp Penya, Abilene Christian University, Respondent

This panel examines the ways in which religious institutions, including churches and universities, play a central role in gender socialization. The panelists will explore the intersection of race, religion, and gender roles and the ways in which this intersectionality produces violence, disenfranchisement, and inequality.

Interdisciplinary

“Memoir and Vision for the Church, Session I” - Ezell Center 136

Gayle Crowe, World Vision, Convener

  • Fred Gray, Attorney at Law, Tuskegee, Alabama
  • Janice Brown, Court of Appeals Judge Washington, D.C.,
  • J. J. M. Roberts, Princeton University, Emeritus
  • Jason Fikes, Abilene Christian University Press, Respondent

“Think of us in this way,” wrote Paul to the Corinthians, “as servants of Christ and stewards of God’s mysteries. Each of those whose lives have been spent ministering to the church came to their ministries in unique ways. Two panels this week will allow noted scholars and senior church leaders to reflect on what it was that led them to serve God's people. Each of these--all of whom have advanced degrees from the world's premier universities and seminaries--will conclude by casting their vision for what church life might look like in future years.

Missional Theology and World Christianity

“Intentional Christian Community and the Future of Theological Education” - Swang Center 242

Kent SmithAbilene Christian University and Greg McKinzieFuller Theological Seminary, Co-Conveners

  • Leonard Allen, Lipscomb University, Panelist
  • Alden Bass, Oklahoma Christian University, Panelist
  • Elaine Heath, Duke Divinity School, Panelist
  • Mark Love, Rochester College, Panelist
  • Kent Smith, Abilene Christian University, Panelist

Theological education in post-Christian Western culture is in the midst of an epochal shift. Denominational decline, financial instability, and institutional suspicion are significant factors in this transition. In this context, the relationship of seminaries, colleges, and universities with emerging ecclesiologies is a significant issue. This panel discussion responds to the specific question: What role should intentional Christian communities play in the revisioning of theological education in this twenty-first century?

Practical Theology

A Grounded Research Study on the Expectations of Ministers” - Swang Center 234

Brady BryceAbilene Christian University, Convener

  • Brady Bryce, Abilene Christian University, “A Grounded Research Study on the Expectations of Ministers”
  • Sara Barton, Pepperdine University, Respondent
  • Jeff Cary, Lubbock Christian University, Respondent
  • Gregory E. Sterling, Yale Divinity School, Respondent

In non-denominational, Protestant Christian groups, the expectations people hold for ministers or ministry practice often are assumed tacitly rather than stated formally.  A research study conducted among the Free Church movement of Churches of Christ identifies respondent expectations for effective ministry.  This grounded research surfaces themes and compares these themes across interest groups (ministers, church leaders, church members, church volunteers, and seminary faculty).  The motivation is to improve clarity of these expectations for ministers by making them more explicit in order to potentially improve minister preparation.  Brady Bryce will present research findings and three responses will be delivered.

Science

“Pedagogy of Science and Faith in the University Classroom” - Swang Center 232

Amanda L. BostonLubbock Christian University, Convener

  • Uduak Afangideh, Faulkner University, Panelist
  • Jim Baird, Oklahoma Christian University, Panelist
  • Kirt Martin, Lubbock Christian University, Panelist

This panel will explore different perspectives about teaching science and faith in the University classroom. Dr. Afangideh teaches genetics and other science courses for majors and non-majors. Dr. Baird specializes in Christian evidences and the philosophy of religion and co-teaches an Honors course titled “The Bible, Science, and Human Values.” Dr. Martin will talk about his experience as a botanist and professor of various science courses including Evolution. Each panelist has a different perspective on how to incorporate science and faith which will lead to a rich discussion in this panel.

Session 6: Friday June 8, 9:00 – 10:30 a.m.

American Religions

"Major Book Review: RoseAnn Benson, Alexander Campbell and Joseph Smith: 19th-Century Restorationists (BYU Press/ACU Press, 2017)" - Swang Center 112

Brett Benson, Vanderbilt University, Convener

  • Grant Underwood, Brigham Young University, Reviewer
  • Nathaniel Wiewora, Harding University, Reviewer
  • RoseAnn Benson, Brigham Young University, Respondent

What does restoration mean? Alexander Campbell and Joseph Smith: 19th-Century Restorationists, written by RoseAnn Benson, examines what restoration meant to Mormonism and the Stone-Campbell tradition. She describes their beliefs, their interactions with each other, their similarities, their differences, and their contributions to Christianity. Two historians—one from the Stone-Campbell tradition and one from the Latter-Day Saints tradition—will reflect on the implications of this important book. The author will respond and there will be time for questions from the audience.

Christianity, Literature and Language

“Emergent Truth: Literature, Rhetoric, and Matters of Faith” - Swang Center 232

Steve WeathersAbilene Christian University, Convener

  • Rachel Gould, Vanderbilt University, “John Hawkesworth and the Pursuit of Truthful Fiction”
  • Kyle Crews, Saint Louis University, “The Jesuit Rhetorical Tradition and the Discovery of Emergent Truth”
  • Taten Shirley, Faulkner University, “Aristotelian Truth in Virginia Woolf’s Mrs. Dalloway
  • Summer E. Dickinson, Indiana University of Pennsylvania, “On Literate lives: Materials, Senses, and Non-Normative Practices in Language and Writing”

The four papers in this session will examine the idea of emergent truth through the lenses of literary studies, philosophy, rhetorical traditions, and critical theory. From ancient works to more contemporary writings, our panelists will comment on the revelation of truth and how writers and thinkers inform our ideas of faith and culture.

Civil Rights & Early Career Scholars in Theological Disciplines

Churches of Christ for Racial Justice: A Strategic Conversation” - Ezell Center 136

Tanya Brice, Bowie State University, Convener

  • Josh Jackson, Argyle Church of Christ, Jacksonville, FL
  • Patricia Brock, American Baptist College
  • Derrick Jackson, First Baptist Church, Gallatin, TN
  • Claire Davidson Frederick, Lipscomb University, Engage Program
  • Thomas Kleinert, Vine Street Christian Church
  • Jeff Brown, Woodmont Church of Christ, Nashville, TN

The U.S. was founded in white supremacy, the nation’s “original sin.” Beyond its earliest history, and despite apparent progress, white supremacy remains, both implicitly and explicitly, a fundamental feature of life in the U.S. today. How might Churches of Christ enter more deeply into the work of both accounting for their past and contributing to racial justice movements more broadly in the present and future? This session will bring together church leaders, scholars, and practitioners for a strategic conversation on equipping congregations to “learn and unlearn” white supremacy and contribute to racial justice both inside and outside their walls.

Creative Writing

“Emergent Truth: A Reading” - Ezell Center 211

John Struloeff, Pepperdine University, Convener

  • Nathan Dahlstrom, Lubbock, TX
  • Albert Haley, Abilene Christian University
  • Terry Engel, Harding University
  • Donovan McAbee, Belmont University
  • John Struloeff, Pepperdine University

This panel features five CSC authors reading from their own creative works of poetry and memoir on the theme of “emergent truth.” Nathan Dahlstrom, a poet from Texas, will offer observations of family and nature, while another Texas poet, Albert Haley, will read poems that articulate new metaphors for God to refresh age-old truths about the Triune God. Nashville poet, Donovan McAbee, will offer poetry itself as a theological method, alongside Oregon poet, John Struloeff, whose work focuses on what emerges from spiritual crises. Arkansas memoirist Terry Engel will detail his own emergent truth, acknowledging and overcoming a racist childhood.

Early Career Scholars in Theological Disciplines

“Particularity and Truth” - Swang Center 234

Stanley TalbertUnion Theological Seminary, Convener

  • Katrina J. Olson, Vanderbilt University, “Preaching in an Age of Alternative Facts: Communally Embodying Paradigms of Truth”
  • David Mahfood, Independent Scholar,“The Truth of All Things is Found in the Word: A Reflection on Anselm’s Christological Account of Truth”
  • Nathan G. Wheeler, Liberty University, “Kaleidescope or Mosaic?: A Theological Semiotics of Emergent Complexity”

Scholars of religion examine the idea of “truth” in relationship to particularities of social context, cultural practice, and identity. This session will take up the question of truth’s loci. Does truth ultimately transcend particularity or does particularity pervade and enable the proclamation of truth? Presenters will explore these questions from sub-disciplinary approaches including homiletics, theology, and philosophy.

Health Sciences

“Discovery as a Means to Promote Graduate Health Science Education” - Swang Center 242

            Jeff McCormack, Oklahoma Christian University, Convener

  • Hope A. Martin, Abilene Christian University, “Using 3D Printing to Address Patient Care Needs”
  • Kevin A. Clauson, Lipscomb University, “Blockchain as a Futuristic Application in Health Care”
  • Elizabeth Breeden, Lipscomb University, “IBM Watson As an Analytic Tool in Informatics”
  • Tommy Wilson, Lipscomb University, “Unknotting the World of Topoisomerase II”

Basic and biomedical science research are critical efforts in our modern era. Discovering the molecular basis of disease and basic molecular processes enable us to develop strategies for more effective therapeutics, pesticides, and other life-improving chemicals. Our commission to “fill the earth and subdue it” (Genesis 1:28) brings with it a great responsibility to be wise and careful stewards of the creation. Further, the recognition that the we can see the eternal attributes of God “in the things that have been made” (Romans 1:20), make our calling as scientists in discovery a valuable and holy calling.

Interdisciplinary Studies

“Major Book Review: Robert E. Hooper, If Your Enemy Hungers, Feed Him: Church of Christ Missionaries in Japan, 1892–1970 (ACU Press, 2017)" - Beaman Library

Doug Foster, Abilene Christian University, and Jeremy Hegi, Boston, Co-Conveners

  • Yukikazu Obata, Ibaraki Christian University, “War, Mission, and Education in Trans-Pacific Perspectives: A Response to Robert E. Hooper, If Your Enemy Hungers, Feed Him (2017)”
  • Brady Kal Cox, Abilene Christian University, “'The Tortuous Path of Church Politics': Transitions in Churches of Christ Leadership in Postwar Japan"
  • Jeremy Hegi, Boston University, "Churches of Christ in American Protestant Missions History: A Response to Robert E. Hooper, If Your Enemy Hungers, Feed Him (2017)"

With the 2013 publication of The Stone Campbell Movement: A Global History a new phase in the historiography of the Stone-Campbell Movement emerged that revealed new opportunities for historical inquiry. The lack of critical historical investigation of Churches of Christ missions history represents one of these opportunities. In his book, If Your Enemy Hungers, Feed Him: Church of Christ Missionaries in Japan, 1892-1970, Robert Hooper narrates the work of American missionaries in Japan that illuminates this understudied segment of the history of Churches of Christ. This panel discusses Hooper’s book from three perspectives: trans-pacific, archival, and American missions history.

This session will be held from 8:00 - 9:30 a.m. on Friday. A free breakfast reception with Robert E. Hooper will be held at 7:00 a.m. in the Paul Rodgers Board Room, Ezell Center, preceding the session. The Master of ceremonies for the breakfast will be Tim Johnson, Lipscomb University. Following the session, a book signing with Robert E. Hooper will be held in the lobby of the Ezell Center from 9:30 - 10:00 a.m.

“Memoir and Vision for the Church, Session II” - Ezell Center 107

Gayle Crowe, World Vision, Convener

  • John Willis, Abilene Christian University, Emeritus
  • Carolyn Hunter, Pepperdine University
  • Dwain Evans, MDE Properties, Inc., Houston, Texas
  • Jason Fikes, Abilene Christian University Press, Respondent

“Think of us in this way,” wrote Paul to the Corinthians, “as servants of Christ and stewards of God’s mysteries. Each of those whose lives have been spent ministering to the church came to their ministries in unique ways. Two panels this week will allow noted scholars and senior church leaders to reflect on what it was that led them to serve God's people. Each of these--all of whom have advanced degrees from the world's premier universities and seminaries--will conclude by casting their vision for what church life might look like in future years.

The Third Annual Landon Saunders’ Lecture: “The Human Being: The Nexus of the World and Faith”

“The ‘World’ as Context: Paul’s Moral Reasoning in 1 Cor. 5:1-11:1” - Ezell Center 241 (Chapel)

James WaltersBoston University

Ross Cochran, Harding University, Convener

  • James Walters, Boston University, “The ‘World’ as Context: Paul’s Moral Reasoning in 1 Cor. 5:1-11:1”
  • Catherine Meeks, Wesleyan College, Emeritus & Absalom Jones Center for Racial Healing, Atlanta
  • Dale Martin, Yale University
  • Lawrence W. Rodgers, Westside Church of Christ, Baltimore, MD & Howard University School of Divinity

This session focuses on the richest trove of texts in Paul’s correspondence in which he advises churches/Christ-followers regarding their interactions with outsiders/unbelievers (1 Cor. 5:1-11:1). Walters’ paper places selected texts in their ancient historical and literary contexts and asks how Paul’s Gentile mission and behavioral recommendations depended on his particular “reading of the world.”  Walters will suggest that Landon Saunders’ work with Heartbeat reflects a similarly aggressive “reading of the world” and notes some of the theological moves that belong to their respective readings. Three respondents will sharpen and critique the issues raised by this analysis.

Missional Theology and World Christianity

“21st Century Missiology: Emerging Issues” - Ezell Center 138

       Chris FlandersAbilene Christian University, Convener

  • Gailyn Van Rheenen, Atlanta, GA, Presenter, “The Essence of Renewal; the Anatomy of Decline: Ten Priority Questions for Renewal”
  • Dan Rodriguez, Pepperdine University, Presenter, “Diaspora Missions in an Anti-immigrant Context: A Hispanic Evangelical Perspective”
  • Linda Whitmer, Johnson University, Presenter, “Motivation for Mission and the New Global Reality”
  • Jared Looney, Global City Mission Initiative, The Bronx, NY, Presenter, “Global Shifts and Implications for Missions”

As the global church moves firmly into the twenty-first century, new global realities are challenging previous missiological paradigms and shaping new ones. Presenters will offer fresh perspectives on critical missiological issues and how the global missiological community can engage these new realities.

New Testament

“New Discoveries in the Field of New Testament: Peer Reviewed Papers Judged on Originality, Clarity, and Exegetical Rigor” - Swang Center 238

Richard A. Wright, Abilene Christian University, Convener

  • Ron Clark, Portland Seminary, “Associating with the Humiliated: Paul's Hermeneutic of Transformation in Romans 12:1-16”
  • Jon Carman, Baylor University, “Scaling Gaius and Diotrephes: Socio-Economic Stratification in 3 John”
  • Garrett Best, Asbury Seminary, “Reading and Writing Gooder: Solecisms in Revelation”

What did the early Jesus-Followers in the first-century experience when they assembled?  The three papers in this session examine texts from Paul, John the Elder, and John the Seer to highlight what they indicate about the expectations these authors had for social and liturgical experiences that would have likely occurred in these communities.  Addressing issues of personal transformation, social stratification, and the reading and hearing of a revelation with irregular grammar, the three papers represent developing theories about the self-understanding and practices of these communities based on neglected features within texts.

Patristics

“Ancient Christianity and Judaism: A Legacy of Shared Mis/understandings” - Ezell Center 109

Trevor W. ThompsonUniversity of Chicago and Calvin College, Convener

  • James E. Walters, Rochester College, “The Reception of Gen. 2:7 and the Nature of the Soul in Early Christianity”
  • Kaylynn Myers, Kunming, Yunnan, China “The Harlot of the Promised Land: Rahab in Early Christian Thought”
  • David Kneip, Abilene Christian University, “‘Living Statues of the Lord’: Clement of Alexandria and His Response to Judaism and Greco-Roman Religion”
  • Michael Strickland, Amridge University and Father Stephen DeYoung, Archangel Gabriel Orthodox Church, Lafayette, LA, “‘Reasons Why I Hate The Synagogue’: John Chrysostom’s Anti-Jewish Rhetoric in Context”

The relationship between Jewish and Christian heritages in the early centuries of Christianity was complex and troubled. The papers in this session focus on two issues that are crucial for understanding the legacy of those relationships: 1) the Christian reception of the Jewish scriptures and the interplay of shared interpretive traditions, and 2) the challenge of clarifying patristic approaches to Judaism. This exploration of Hebrew, Greek, Latin, and Syriac traditions will shed light on the roots of the Jewish and Christian legacy of shared mis/understandings.

Teaching, Learning and Technology

“Forging Ahead with Care: Looking Ahead at Emerging Truths and Challenges” - Swang Center 244

Melinda Thompson, Abilene Christian University, and Peter WilliamsAbilene Christian University, Co-Conveners

  • Sarah Gibson, Lipscomb University
  • Colleen Halupa, East Texas Baptist University
  • Chris Simmons, Lipscomb University
  • Chris Rosser, Oklahoma Christian University
  • Jessica Smith, Abilene Christian University

Panelists discuss emerging issues in technology-mediated teaching and learning. This stance of looking into the future should inform strategic thinking about students, learning with technology, and program design. Topics include emerging literacies, roles and identities, ethical issues, and others according to audience interest.

 

Poster and Paper Abstracts

Poster Abstracts

Business Poster Session: “Business as Mission and Humanitarian Engineering”

Andy Borchers, Lipscomb University, Convener, June 7, 2018 Bennett Student Center Upper Level 12:15 pm - 1:45 pm

This poster session highlights student and faculty work on Business as Mission and Humanitarian Engineering. Business as Mission seeks to engage business resources for missional impact. BAM is real business, complete with profit, building the Kingdom of God. Humanitarian engineering efforts engage students and faculty in meeting the needs in the developing world.

Health Science Poster Session

Roger L. Davis, Lipscomb University, Convener, June 7, 2018 Bennett Student Center Upper Level 12:15 pm - 1:45 pm

This poster session is intended to highlight individual inquisitiveness, original thoughts and application of new pedagogical approaches and technology. Each poster emphasizes methods which can be applied in the classroom. The authors responsible for each poster will be available to discuss their work and to provide additional information. The session will provide inspiration and direction for those who have the desire to enhance their personal growth and development, their academic careers, and their ability to stimulate student learning and success.

Gracia M. Amaya, Rebecca Durandis, Kahari J. Wines, Arsany A. Abouda, Samuel A. Starks, R. Nathan Daniels, and Klarissa D. Jackson, Lipscomb University, Metabolic Activation of Sunitinib: Implications for Sunitinib-Induced Toxicities”

Sunitinib is a tyrosine kinase inhibitor used to treatment renal cell carcinoma. However, clinical use of sunitinib is associated with severe liver injury in some patients. The purpose of this study was to define the role of cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes in the metabolism of sunitinib to provide insight into the mechanisms of drug toxicity. The results of this study demonstrated that both CYP1A2 and CYP3A4 contribute to the metabolic activation of sunitinib to form a chemically reactive, potentially toxic metabolite. These findings suggest that factors that alter CYP1A2 and CYP3A4 activity may affect patient risk for sunitinib-induced toxicities.

Tamara Baird, Lipscomb University, “Communication Competency: An Examination of Communication Methodology and Tools for Nursing Faculty and Students”

Nursing curriculum is comprised of didactic content, clinical skills and competency examinations. The Joint Commission reported in 2014 that communication was the number one reason for being the root cause in delay of treatment in 787 cases (JC, 2015). Data suggests a need to include learning opportunities about communication models, skills and tools in the nursing curricula. The Communication Exchange Model (Baird, 2017) is based on the nursing process, King’s Theory of Goal Attainment (King, 1981) and Dance’s Helical Model of Communication (Dance, 1982). Nurse educators found the Communication Exchange Model applicable to healthcare and science faculty.

Chezka Baker, Elizabeth Breeden, and Scott Nelson, Vanderbilt University Medical Center and Lipscomb University College of Pharmacy, “Emergency department clinician perception and utilization of external medication history data available within a newly implemented electronic health record (EHR)”

Medication reconciliation is a key, interdisciplinary process within the healthcare continuum. A Best Possible Medication History (BPMH) must be obtained to accurately perform the medication reconciliation process. Inaccurate medication data and errors of omission impede BPMH collection. Utilizing medication data from external sources can decrease errors and provide a more complete medication history. Opportunities exist to leverage prescription claims and fill history data through health information exchange within electronic health records (EHR). The primary objective of this study is to characterize clinician perceptions regarding utilization of external medication history data available within an EHR in a large, academic medical center.

Leslie Boiles, Abilene Christian University, “To Screen or Not to Screen: Perceptions of Implementing a School- Based Depression Screening Program for Adolescents in a West Texas School District”

The assessment appraises obstacles and benefits of in-school adolescent depression screening in a West Texas public school district. Two surveys were utilized to collect data via hard copy and electronic application. Data collected via the Qualtrics electronic survey system at Texas Tech University and was analyzed using SPSS version 23 software. The research addresses a descriptive community needs assessment completed during my Doctor of Nursing practice program at Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center. Survey finding demonstrate majority support for in-school, adolescent depression screening.

Vincent Cavaliere, Jacob Wetsell, Francisco Grajales, Samantha Fritz, and Kevin A. Clauson, Lipscomb University, “Characterization of personally identifiable information from medication-related hashtags: a photograph analysis from Instagram”

Instagram is a photograph (photo) sharing platform that features the self-photo or “selfie”. Selfies may unintentionally disclose personally identifiable information (PII). The objective of this study was to identify the level and magnitude of PII disclosed on Instagram posts via user-generated, medication- related hashtags. Medication-related hashtags were identified through snowball sampling. Hashtagged photos and metadata were collected and coded. 595,460 records were generated from hashtags. De- duplication and a weighted approach of a 10% sample (n=30,819) yielded a final dataset (n=9,171). PII was further categorized into subtypes during staged coding. Initial results indicate presence of PII within the sample.

Zachary Cox, Pikki Lai, Connie Lewis, and JoAnn Lindenfeld, Lipscomb University College of Pharmacy; Vanderbilt University Medical Center, “Acute Presenting Blood Glucose Change from Average Outpatient Glucose and 30-day Outcomes After Acute Heart Failure Hospitalization”

The relationship of presenting blood glucose (pBG), average chronic glucose (cBG), and the association with 30-day readmission or mortality after Acute Heart Failure (AHF) hospitalization is unknown. The team analyzed patients (n=2,120) age ³ 65 after AHF hospitalization. pBG was ±50mg/dl of cBG in 75% of admissions. cBG was not associated with 30-day outcomes. Only pBG > +100mg/dl from cBG was associated with increased 30-day mortality and readmission (p=0.01). pBG (<70, 110-140, 141-170, 171-200, 201-250, >250 mg/dl) was not associated with 30-day outcomes. Presenting PB regularly reflects chronic glycemic status. Treating presenting hyperglycemia may not alter 30-day outcomes).

Leah I. Fullman and Joshua S. Fullman, Faulkner University, “Effects of Increased Instructor-Initiated Out-of-Class Communication on Student Performance in a Core Composition Course”

In a review of the extant literature on teacher-student relationships, Hagenauer and Volet (2014) noted there is little comprehensive or systematic research on the teacher-student relationship in higher education. They observed that the majority of studies are qualitative, investigating the effect of the frequency of out-of-class communication on the quality of the teacher-student relationship and the connectedness of the student to the university. The authors were able to locate few studies using quantitative methodology. One experimental study (Clark, Walker, and Keith, 2002), investigated effects of student-instructor out-of-class communication during mandatory weekly office visits among upper classmen and found increased out-of-class communication may play a causal role in student learning. However, weekly office visits with large numbers of students is cumbersome for instructors to manage in practice. This investigation used quantitative research methods to explore the effects of increased out-of-class electronic communication between the instructor and lower classmen (primarily freshmen and sophomores) enrolled in a core curriculum composition course. Using a single-blinded experimental design, the study investigated the effects of increased instructor-initiated out-of-class communication via email in a core composition course on student performance as measured by attendance rate, course completion rate, assignment completion rate, and final course grade, as compared to a control group.

Ben Gross and Haley Willett, Lipscomb University, “Implementation of Ambulatory Care Services within a Multispecialty Medical Group”

Collaborative pharmacy practice agreements (CPPA’s) allow licensed pharmacists the ability to work jointly with licensed physicians. CPPA’s detail the pharmacist’s scope of practice (SOP) as it relates to medication management within a facility or provider’s office. Two licensed pharmacists – one with extensive ambulatory care experiences and one with post-graduate year two ambulatory care pharmacy resident – established pharmacist presence within a PCMH in Columbia, Tennessee. Both the patient population and existing physician services were evaluated to identify areas of opportunity for pharmacists intervention.

Leigh Holley, Abilene Christian University, “Behind the Mask: The New Face of Clinical Nursing Simulation”

Simulation in nursing education is an effective way to internalize nursing concepts through experiential learning. Advances in simulation pedagogy allow educators to facilitate learning in ways unimaginable in the time when simulation was first introduced. Mask-Ed™ is an innovative new form of patient simulation using realistic silicone masks and props to disguise the identity of an experienced nurse who portrays an authentic character giving way to an unscripted learning experience between educator, student, and patient/character. Mask Ed™ may be an effective tool promoting excellence in clinical simulation resulting in achievement of learning outcomes and enhanced knowledge retention.

Mark A. Naguib, Will Hedges, Alli Dyer, Beshoy Abdelmessih, Zach Fasig, and R. Nathan Daniels, Lipscomb University, “Development of Allosteric Modulators of MC4R for the Treatment of Obesity”

The melanocortin 4 receptor (MC4R) is a G-protein coupled receptor expressed primarily in the central nervous system with a dual function of regulating appetite and energy expenditure. While, efficacious, MC4R orthosteric agonists have been developed by various pharmaceutical companies for the treatment of obesity, they cause adverse reactions such as hypertension and tachycardia. In an attempt to avoid adverse reactions, libraries of allosteric compounds have been developed using a multidimensional iterative parallel synthesis approach in an attempt to increase potency, solubility, and specificity.

Robin Parker and Whitney NarramoreLipscomb University, "Closing the Loop: The Pharmacist's Role in Deprescribing through Transitions of Care”

The Center for Quality Aging at Vanderbilt University Medical Center received NIH-funding for a project utilizing clinical pharmacists and geriatric nurse practitioners to initiate deprescribing in older patients transitioning from acute care inpatient status to a skilled nursing facility (SNF). Patient-centered deprescribing involves discussions about goals of care, beliefs about medications, and patient willingness to deprescribe. The protocol includes communications with the inpatient team and SNF care providers as well as outpatient providers once a patient is discharged home.

Jonathan Pouliot, Kali Worley, Jeff Lee, Anne Lowery, Autumn Marshall, Katie Watson, Tom Campbell, and Susan Morley, Lipscomb University, “The Use of Motivational Interviewing Skills for Patient Counseling in an Interprofessional Education Learning Simulation”

The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of motivational interviewing training in patient counseling simulations and as an effective platform for promoting interprofessional education. A cohort of nursing, dietetic, and pharmacy students enrolled in an interprofessional patient care education course were evaluated on patient counseling effectiveness before and after a comprehensive motivational interviewing training. Student performance improved following motivational interviewing training. Motivational interviewing training may be an effective tool in interprofessional education settings.

Lincoln Shade, Kevin Flatt, Mallory Burns, Ankit Patras, and Matthew Vergne, Lipscomb University; Tennessee State University, “UV-C light technology as an alternative to pasteurization: quantification of antioxidants and amino acids in green tea, apple juice, and coconut water”

Ultraviolet light (UV-C) technology can be used to disinfect beverages as an alternative to heat pasteurization.  The effects of UV-C light on the concentrations of nutrients in apple juice, green tea, and coconut water were determined by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.  UV-C fluence levels were 0 to 240 mJ·cm -2 . For apple juice, the concentrations of chlorogenic acid and phlorizin were not diminished with UV-C exposure.  Catechins in green tea were slightly reduced, and the essential amino acids in coconut water were not significantly reduced.

Marcia Straughn, Abilene Christian University, “A Descriptive Phenomenological Study of Nursing Student Experiences of Clinical Data Use in Clinical Rotations”

Clinical learning experiences are important opportunities for nursing students to gather and synthesize clinical data, provide nursing interventions, evaluate patient outcomes, and apply classroom content. To ensure quality clinical learning, it is vital to hear the voices of nursing students on how they experience clinical learning, particularly with regards to clinical data use. The six themes that emerged from analysis included Help Wanted, Making Sense, Recognizing Usefulness, Engaging in Communication, Nurse as Key Player, and Emotionally Charged. The findings may be used to assist nurse educators in developing effective ways to help students use clinical data for effective clinical learning.

Paper Abstracts

Ian Aipperspach, Lubbock Christian University, “To Boldly Go Where No One Has Gone Before”: Sociopolitical, Ideological and Star Trek “Reboot” Franchise”

The science fiction genre, such as the Star Trek franchise, has helped proliferate sociopolitical and ideological issues throughout the second half of the 20th Century. In the original series, one could detect the U.S. versus Communist tensions amongst other reflections of society. The subsequent films contain sociopolitical and ideological elements about the dangers of genetically modified life, ecology, and the search for God. However, the “reboot” of the Star Trek series in 2009 continues a discussion that might alienate audiences. The 21st century versions of the franchise function as a heurist toward examining national identity politics and contemporary questions regarding “otherness.”

Clifford Anderson, Vanderbilt University, “Geographical Indication and Religious Authenticity”

A ‘geographical indication’ is a form of intellectual property protection designed to protect products with spatial associations in the minds of consumers. Think “Cognac” or “Dijon mustard.” Continuing a series on the theology of intellectual property, I examine the relevance of ‘geographical indication’ to religious faith. Given the connection of religious beliefs to specific places, how do we discriminate between authentic and inauthentic ties? By tracing the spatial displacement of religious practices in an age of wide-scale population movement, I discern how equivalents to ‘geographic indications’ emerge, transform, and function in everyday religious experience.

Jeremy Barrier, Heritage Christian University, “Who Has the Evil Eye? Various Interpretations of Sarai and Hagar in Genesis 12–21”

In the Genesis Rabbah 45.5, an interpretation of Gen 16:11 is set forth that suggests Hagar miscarried in the wilderness and conceived anew afterward.  For this interpreter, Hagar miscarried because Sarai gave her the Evil Eye. This rabbinic interpretation indicates that Sarai had the Evil Eye.  This interpretation can help make sense of several other important parts of the story told from Genesis 12–21. These texts reflect a socio-cultural worldview that incorporates such ideas as the “Evil Eye” into it. 

Justin Bronson Barringer, Southern Methodist University, “The Coming Schism: Using the LGBTQ Discussion as a Lens for Understanding Wesleyan/Holiness Ecclesial-Academic Relations.’

As a Church of Christ kid currently situated in the United Methodist Church, I often find myself confused by the supposed connectional system. This essay attempts to explore the polity of this connectional system in the United Methodist Church and its relationship to the theological academy, as well as the understanding of the “laity” about both the denominational structure and the theological academy. This essay will examine these relationships and understandings through the lens of current discussions around LGBTQ marriage and ordination at the conference and denominational levels, among UMC affiliated academies and “lay” church members.

Sara Barton, Pepperdine University, “University Spiritual Formation and the Importance of Ecclesial Relationships” 

Many Christian universities have spiritual formation goals. These discussions, however, tend to overemphasize individual and inner aspects of spirituality while disregarding communal and social relationships, creative abilities, moral and ethical capacities, intellectual capabilities, sexuality, bodily senses, and emotion. This has resulted in a view of spirituality in which neither one's physical body, other persons, or church communities are necessary for spiritual growth. Spirituality is thus disembodied (internal) and dis-embedded (individual). Recognizing that the university is not the church, this paper will reflect on the relationship universities must have with the church for holistic spiritual formation.

Alden Bass, Oklahoma Christian University, “Radical and Restorationist: Stone-Campbell Resources for Christian Intentional Community”

Restorationists are specially gifted to advance missional communities in North America. The fellowship was formed in rural regions and carries within patterns of holistic wisdom that can be adapted to a fragmented urban world. The emphasis on biblical “costly discipleship” has primed members for life together. Elements latent within the Restoration Movement (e.g., ecumenism and pacifism) provide further support for communities to unite believers from different traditions and to distinguish them from the dominant culture. Even sectarianism, if transformed, offers the basis for a robust countercultural identity. Moreover, as autonomous congregations, Restorationists can adopt new practices more quickly than mainlines.

Frank V. Bellizzi, Texas Tech University, “A Christian School in Indian Territory/Oklahoma, 1889–1920: Meta Chestnutt's Appeals to Chickasaw Leaders”

Sometime after she arrived in Indian Territory in 1889, Meta Chestnutt addressed the council of the Chickasaw Nation. Speaking through an interpreter, the Disciple missionary-educator appealed to the leaders that they would no longer send their best students to government-sponsored schools outside the borders of Chickasaw territory. Rather, she urged, they should send their students, along with their education stipends, to schools within the nation, like her own El Meta Christian College at Minco. This paper will explore Chestnutt’s missionary aspirations as they related to the financial needs of both her school and her students, and the public-education goals of the Chickasaw Nation.

Brett Benson, Vanderbilt University, “Expressing Bias Through 'Cover' Issues”

While the last decade has witnessed positive trends in the number of under-represented candidates running for electoral office, such candidates still face obstacles resulting from biases among the electorate. Scholars face hurdles in assessing how bias operates in real elections given pressures of social desirability among the public. Especially problematic for identifying bias is the possibility that citizens who are unwilling to express bias might employ alternative justifications or excuses for opposing a candidate. My research examines how voters used non-biased justifications to cover for anti-Mormon bias in the 2007 Republican primary as well as the charge that Obama has “no substance” in the 2008 general election. 

Garrett Best, Asbury Seminary, “Reading and Writing Gooder: Solecisms in Revelation”

As many as 232 solecisms (morpho-syntactical errors) may exist within the Greek of the Apocalypse. While scholars have sought to explain the solecisms in Revelation, few have explored the aural dimension. Since the book was designed to be read aloud, it is important to investigate how irregular grammar would have affected the first hearers. I examine how solecisms were viewed in the ancient world and how ancients responded when lectors made mistakes in reading. Historical analogies suggest that the solecisms would have posed challenges for the lector as well as first-century audiences and that the lector was faced with important decisions on how best to deliver the document.

Greg Bonadies, Resurrect, LLC, “Property Rules:  Ideas, Incentives, Production, and Prosperity”

Systems of law and property rights institutions provide the incentive structure for individuals and groups to implement ideas and methods to produce goods for consumption that are associated with prosperity.  I will examine the meaning of basic terms and concepts of property, rights, entitlement, wealth, poverty, and legal institutions drawing on the language of economics, psychology, sociology, and biology.  I conclude with discussion of the normative questions:  What is the form, structure, and function of efficient, fair, just, or ideal property rights regimes, how can these be implemented, and how can outcomes in terms of human well-being be measured empirically?

Andy Borchers, Lipscomb University, “VW Diesel Scandal” (Pecha Kucha)

The 2015 announcement of Volkswagen’s intentional use of “defeat devices” on diesel vehicles provides yet another conspicuous indictment of a large corporation for the lack of ethical conduct.  VW’s decision to cheat on emissions has cost the firm over $30 billion in identifiable costs plus incalculable losses in reputation that will take years to overcome.  Luann Lynch identifies three factors that led to the scandal: Pressure from autocratic management to achieve results “no matter what”, opportunity given the technology and the rationalization based on past penalties for cheating.  This presentation highlights the story and important ethical lessons for leaders.

David Bosch, Boyce College, “Does Entrepreneurial Education Matter? The Impact on Entrepreneurial Intentions at Faith-Based Institutions”

Entrepreneurship is the engine of economic growth within a country and also innovation in the world. The purpose of this exploratory study was to understand the role education plays in an individual’s entrepreneurial intent, the precursor to entrepreneurial activity. This research also explores the differing impact that Entrepreneurial Education has on the different genders. This study utilizes a pre-test post-test design of business students (N=114) in a semester long entrepreneurship class at two faith-based institutions.

Beau Branson, Brescia University, “The Forgotten Monarchy of the Father in Analytic Discussions of the Trinity”

The doctrine of the “Monarchy of the Father” is strongly supported in patristic texts, yet seldom addressed in analytic discussions of the Trinity. The strongest disambiguation of this doctrine is that the Father alone is “the One True God.” I show this view is compatible with a surprisingly wide range of analytic models of the Trinity, despite their being intended to be more egalitarian. But since the strongest contemporary objections to the doctrine of the Trinity are really just arguments for the Monarchy, models that are at least Monarchy-friendly are dialectically stronger than egalitarian models.

Elizabeth Breeden, Lipscomb University, "IBM Watson as Analytic Tool in Informatics"

IBM Watson Analytics is a cloud-based analytics service utilized to evaluate data and find actionable insights without requiring advanced technical or coding expertise. The easy-to-use interface combined with cognitive computing capabilities, like natural language processing, guides users through predictive analytics evaluations.

Lipscomb University College of Pharmacy is the first college of pharmacy in the nation to provide students full access to Watson Analytics as part of its curriculum. Students utilize Watson to uncover trends and insights in data discovery. This session will focus on exploring the IBM Watson analytics tool and its application in pharmacy and healthcare informatics programs.

Kevin Brown, Asbury University,” How Shall We Then Leisure?”

The robots are coming.  Technological innovation has blossomed at a breakneck pace, leading experts to predict a labor landscape dominated by advanced machinery and unprecedented unemployment.  Are we entering a world without work?  A century ago, economist John Meynard Keynes predicted a similar phenomenon where machines would increasingly eclipse human labor. However, his animating question had a different focus: “How will we occupy the leisure?”  We know how to work, but do we know how to rest?  Could it be that the most radical expression of faith in the future is a holistic, faithful, and humanizing approach to leisure?

Orneita Burton, Abilene Christian University, “Re-engineering Corporate Social Responsibility and Sustainability in the Justice System”

This year’s theme, “Discovery, The Challenge of Emergent Truth,” provides an opportunity to consider how network theory can be employed to improve community outcomes. We take a closer look at the Justice system and investigate ways to re-engineer processes to promote the beneficial development of community resources.  We draw from theories that explain the economics of markets and hierarchies (Williamson, 1975), considering the impact of survivorship of capital structures vs survival of the individual.  Such outcomes are also explained by transaction cost economics (Coase, 1937; Williamson, 1989), considering efficiencies in individual market activity vs the enhancement and growth of organizations.   

Jon Carman, Baylor University, “Scaling Gaius and Diotrephes: Socio-Economic Stratification in 3 John”

Johannine Epistles have been the subject of sociological interpretations, however, few scholars have delved deeper into this material to fine-tune the portrait of social stratification that appears in 1 and 3 John. I propose to push the study of stratification in the Johannine epistles further by applying Longenecker's model of socio-economic scaling to the conflict between Gaius and Diatrophes in 3 John. This analysis reveals that Gaius and Diotrephes likely fall somewhere between ES 4 and ES 6 on Longenecker's scale, and that their economic position entails particular ethical demands broadly consonant with urban communities of Jesus-Followers in the first century C.E.

Cheryl Slay Carr, Belmont University, “Juxtapositions of Freedom: Your Blues Ain’t Like Mine, or Are They?”

Before uttering the film’s defining words, Andy DuFresne declares to Red, “it’s a simple choice, really.” Getting free, living, or dying. Simple choices. For Andy. Each time Red appears before the parole board the gravity of his earnestness is palpable. Yet in contrast to Andy, this African American inmate’s freedom quest is characterized by resignation and a lack of hope. Andy is unjustly accused and believes he deserves to be free; Red is regretful, but admittedly not innocent. This paper examines these juxtapositions as explored in the film, as well as a common need for an escape that is, theologically speaking, spiritual, not just physical.

Raymond Carr, Pepperdine University, "From Shawshank to Redemption and (Re)creation: Human Freedom and the Imago Dei”

When Andy Dufresne (Tim Robbins) arrives at Shawshank State Penitentiary, his relationship to the primordial order lay hidden because Shawshank lives according to its own myth, a constructed world which scorns human life even as it shapes it. Like a trickster Andy steals from the gods the things necessary to survive. Thus his imprisonment is (re)signified; disrupts Shawshank’s normative forms of violence to freely participate in re-ordering the logics of the episteme of the Atlantic World with its civilizing and christianizing projects often identified with Western traditions of Christianity. In this paper I hope to follow Andy’s lead in a movement toward (re)creation.

Carole Carroll, Lubbock Christian University, “‘O’ the Horror’: Stephen King and a Biblical God”

When asked repeatedly about his views on religion, Stephen King, best-selling contemporary horror novelist, remarked, “I made a decision to believe in God…I can use that to make life more livable.” This complex statement makes themes of good versus evil, redemption, grace, and faith, predominantly Christian-centered concepts, an interesting study in his secular-driven novels. This presentation will focus on King’s collection of no novellas, Different Seasons, and the intersections between King’s complex remarks about God and his collection of short fictions that explore the life-cycle of mankind.

T. Brian Cavitt, Lipscomb University, Chemistry and Biochemistry (Jasmine G. Carlisle, Verena N. Ghebranious, D. Spencer Oskin, Emily B. Henry, and Wenting Wei, co-authors), “Comprehensive Surface Free Energy Analyses to Inhibit Biofilm Formation”

Found on various surfaces, biofilms successfully protect bacteria from many antibiotics and are the habitat of 95% of Earth’s bacteria, including infectious bacteria.  Biofilm formation depends on 1) the substrate surface and 2) bacterial adhesins.  In our research group, we couple experimental surface analyses with mathematical processing to determine the surface free energy (SFE) profile of both the substrate surface and bacterial adhesins.  Based on the aforementioned SFE profiles, we can propose a substrate composition to inhibit biofilm formation.  Herein, we tell the story of how to stop infections one surface at a time.

Ron Clark, Portland Seminary and Agape Church of Christ, Portland, OR, “Associating with the Humiliated: Paul's Hermeneutic of Transformation in Romans 12:1-16”

Paul guided the Roman Christians to develop connection through the use of “mental/emotional” (phrone) words, spiritual giftedness and mercy, and relationships with the vulnerable members of the congregation. This was transformation. These three steps can help hermeneutically guide congregants to develop empathy, ministry, and relationships with those who feel marginalized in their communities and relationships. Through victims’ stories, hospitality and acceptance, partnering with local agencies, and the power of the Sacred Texts, preaching can offer connection to vulnerable members in the community and to those offering hope and healing to others.

Ron Clark, Portland Seminary and Agape Church of Christ, Portland, OR, “The Emerging Truth of #MeToo: Ministry Among Toxic Masculinity, Survivor Stories, and the God Who Hears the Cries of the Vulnerable”

After 20 years of providing clergy and faith-based Intimate Partner Violence trainings, the #MeToo movement illustrates what many already knew was an underlying problem but is a new discovery in faith-based communities: male privilege, misogyny, and gender oppression. This movement also led to our local service provider’s discovery that faith-based communities still offer valuable resources to their clients and our community. Collaboration between community providers and faith communities provides powerful testimony in a culture numb to the overwhelming gendered violence in today’s world.

Ron Clark, Portland Seminary and Agape Church of Christ, Portland, OR, “Your Warriors Will Become Women: the Feminization of Yahweh and Exiles in Ancient Yehud”

Ancient texts feminize those individuals subject to violence in military, sexual assault, and forced migration. Valiant men are described as weak, afraid, confused, or rape victims when defeated by a more powerful nation or god. The Hebrew Scriptures also use this description to indicate the defeat of Yahweh’s foes whether in the community of Israel or outside its borders. This form of gendered violence language can be ruthless, cruel, and misogynistic.  Biblical texts, however,  “feminize” Yahweh in order to nurture and protect the victim of violence so that shalom will exist.

Kevin A. Clauson, Lipscomb University, "Blockchain as a Futuristic Application in Health Care"

Blockchain is a disruptive technology that made its initial impact in finance, and its most recognized application to date is the virtual currency Bitcoin. However, as recognition of the broader utility of blockchain technology has evolved, its vast potential for health care has been identified. Blockchain is a decentralized ledger of data transactions characterized by its distributed nature, security, and immutability. Those characteristics suggest it maps extremely well as a solution to vulnerabilities in the health supply chain as well as challenges in conducting medical research. This session will explore the fundamentals and promise of blockchain in health care.

Beth Conway, Lipscomb University, Biology (Hannah Stephen, Haley St. John, co-authors), “Neprilysin Methylation in Breast Cancer”

Neprilysin is a protein that has been implicated in breast cancer. Previously, we found that decreased neprilysin expression correlates with lower survival rates in breast cancer patients. Currently, our lab is investigating neprilysin’s role in normal cells found in breast tumors. Initial results suggest that neprilysin functions differently in fibroblasts than in the surrounding breast cancer cells. Additionally, we are using bioinformatics to identify potential therapeutic targets in neprilysin-methylated breast cancers.  Thus, neprilysin may ultimately serve as a novel biomarker for breast cancer.

Salvador Cordova, Feed My Sheep Foundation (Joseph E. Deweese, John Sanford, co-authors), Exploring the Origin of Nylonases”

Nylon is a man-made substance invented in 1935. Nylonases are enzymes that can degrade nylon dimers and oligomers.  Previously, researchers speculated about an allegedly abrupt origin for these enzymes. However, modern research has identified a number of enzymes with the ability to degrade nylon fragments including esterases and proteases. Further, modern genomic databases contain records of hundreds of bacterial species throughout the world that have nylonase homologs (in sequence and/or structure). This study will summarize recent findings related to the structure, function, and possible origins of nylonases.

Ruth Corey, Lipscomb University, "The Experiences of Nurse Practitioners When Communicating Bad News to Cancer Patients"

Research has revealed that nurse practitioners have poor communication skills when delivering bad news to cancer patients due to lack of training in their educational programs. Step one, using a qualitative exploratory descriptive design, nurse practitioners were educated in the use of the “SPIKES Six Step Protocol for Delivering Bad News” then instructed to evaluate it in practice for 30 days. Step two included individual interviews with the nurse practitioners. Thematic analysis revealed seven global themes important to cancer patients when receiving bad news: Relationship, emotional support, supporting patient problem-solving and decision-making, positive environment, human dignity, self-management, and holistic care.

John Crawford, Lipscomb University, “Closing the Church Door”

According to a 2015 study, most American churches have less than 100 in Sunday attendance.  Thousands of churches open each year while thousands close their doors. Many closing churches have existed for decades and were once thriving.  How are church leaders to make the decision to close a church or to remain in place?  Can marketing principles related to product/brand decisions help make that decision?  And it the decision is to remain in place, can marketing tools, such as SERVQUAL, help church leaders in determining how to revitalize the churches they lea

Kyle Crews, Saint Louis University, “The Jesuit Rhetorical Tradition and the Discovery of Emergent Truth”

The Jesuit rhetorical tradition cultivates two epistemic goods that enhance a speaker’s persuasive power: virtuous character and fidelity to truth. This enduring pedagogical tradition fosters a sustained commitment to the discovery of new truth predicated on the development of intellectual virtues like humility, open-mindedness, curiosity, and tenacity. This tradition is valuable in both academic and ecclesial contexts as it seeks to form people of character who welcome emergent truth. What happens when new knowledge emerges? How do we create virtuous people who will “speak the truth in love,” even when it is vigorously opposed by the current keepers of knowledge?

Marguerite Cronk, Harding University, “Corporate Social Responsibility in the Big Data Arena”

Massive amounts of data are collected by a wide range of businesses to aid in their decision making. This presentation "poses questions about the ethics pertaining to data collection in regard to an individual's rights”. Specific issues examined include: data collection without the individual’s knowledge, using algorithms to match data from disparate sources to complete individual profiles, the problem of bias in algorithms and whether corporations should share the results of their analytics with the individual, especially in the health data arena. 

Stephen V. Crowder, Sandia National Laboratories, “The Field is the World: A History of the Canton Mission (1929–1949) of the Churches of Christ”

This talk will discuss the work of a small group of missionaries sent from the Churches of Christ to China in the 1920’s. The account will include the difficult years of preparation (1921–1928), the establishment of the Canton Mission to the onset of the Japanese threat (1929–1937), the heroic efforts during the Japanese occupation and war years (1938–1945), and finally, its work after the war until the Communist takeover (1946–1949). Strategies, successes, failures, and hindrances to the work will be presented.

Ken Cukrowski, Abilene Christian University, “Thinking Theologically about Same Sex Activity: Ten Hermeneutical Lenses”

The academic theological study of same sex activity has largely moved from an exegetical examination of particular scriptures to reflection on the best lens through which to view the issue. Scripture still plays a role, but the question now becomes, “How do additional theological resources influence our interpretation of Scripture?” For example, much in the same way that reason revised the geocentric model of our solar system, one can ask, “Does reason revise our understanding of same sex activity?” This panel presentation examines ten common hermeneutical lenses and assesses the greatest strength and weakness of each position.

Russell Dabbs, Lubbock Christian University, “Virtue Non Est Disputandum?”

Since in economics moral concepts like “virtue” seemingly fall within the broad realm of “tastes and preferences,” they are essentially exogenous and, as such, “there is no disputing such things.” Famous for his contributions on human capital, Gary Becker observed that personal and social capital are crucial for understanding tastes, and that the economic way of the thinking has useful insights to offer about them. This paper will focus on developing a Becker-inspired model of virtue, in the sense of treating virtue as a form of human capital that differs among people and can be augmented (and depleted) over time. 

Christopher Davis, Harding University, “Academic Freedom in Business Schools”

The historical purpose of higher education has been to prepare minds through vigorous debate and dialogue that challenges thinking in an atmosphere of academic freedom. One can argue that education is under siege by today’s generational cohort, hyper-political landscape and disengaged administrators. Academic freedom is being challenged, creating an education void of unfettered teaching and authentic learning. Christian educators preparing students for lives of service in their respective disciplines must assess their role in today’s higher educational system. This requires acknowledgement of the symbiotic relationships between academic freedom and offense, and Christianity and culture.  

Charles DeMotte, State University of New York Cortland, “Baseball as an Expression of Liberty and Freedom”

Societies are built around ideas underscoring American society: liberty and freedom. While often used interchangeably, these terms have distinctive meanings. Liberty refers to the protection of personal freedom from the power of the state and is thus individual in nature. Freedom, pertains to inalienable rights that one possesses within a community, such as equality before the law. Both have particular relevance to baseball. As Bart Giamatti observed, “to know baseball is to continue to aspire to the condition of freedom, individually and as a people.” What he alludes to is that baseball is woven into the fabric of the American narrative. My presentation will explore how baseball, in exemplifying liberty and freedom, represents the national pastime. 

Joseph E. Deweese, Lipscomb University, "Applied Christian Values in Pharmacy - A Longitudinal Course in Values, Ethics, and Compassion"

How do we help our health sciences students connect their faith and their practice? That is the focus of the Applied Christian Values in Pharmacy course series. A three- year rotating curriculum was developed where first-, second-, and third-year student pharmacists learn together about bridging faith and practice. The curriculum includes components regarding values; beliefs; worldviews; ethnic, cultural and faith traditions; caring and compassion; missions; compassionate care in healthcare delivery; and ethics, pain and suffering.  Together, this series helps to prepare our student pharmacists to practice loving, compassionate care in the context of a complex and pluralistic world.

Joseph E. Deweese, Lipscomb University, Pharmacy (Cole A. Fief and Renee A. Menzie, co-authors), “Mapping the Interactions and Post-Translational Modifications of Topoisomerase II”

DNA topoisomerase II is a critical nuclear enzyme that is involved in keeping DNA from becoming entangled during transcription, replication, and cell division. Topoisomerases are drug targets in cancer and bacterial infection. Unfortunately, some topoisomerase II-targeted anticancer agents cause cardiotoxicity or therapy-induced leukemia. The present work aims to map out the known protein-protein interactions and post-translational modifications in an effort to explore of the functions and regulation of this critical enzyme. The purpose of these studies is to develop new, safer strategies for disrupting cancer cell growth.

Summer E. Dickinson, Indiana University of Pennsylvania, “On Literate lives: Materials, Senses, and Non-Normative Practices in Language and Writing”

Davide Panagia said, “There’s nothing quite like the sensation that accompanies an idea.” For some who study writing(s), the materials, sensations, and spaces in our world are simply the backdrop where thinking and writing occurs. However, for others like Panagia, thought and writing are inseparable from the objects within our world; the books on our shelves and the writing does rhetorical work (Latour; Rickert).  This paper explores the ability of objects and spaces to expose unexamined properties of writing—showing previously ignored truths about how our writing, liturgical spaces, and literate lives are, at times, intertwined with materials, languages, and places.?

Steve Donaldson, Samford University, “More than Magic: Science, Theology, and Christian Responsibility”

According to Arthur C. Clarke, “Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.” As a corollary, we might add that any insufficiently advanced theology is indistinguishable from magic. Thus, because of advances in science and despite advances in theology, there is a tendency to view each as magical. Yet, Christians have an implicit mandate to engage both areas in order to grow more fully into the image of God and to fulfill our responsibility for the general public. Here we consider why this obligation is inadequately discharged and examine the multifaceted approach required to produce theologically and scientifically literate Christians.

Terry Engel, Harding University, “Emergent Truth in the Short Fiction of Tobias Wolff: A Stylistic Analysis of the Moment of Epiphany”

Tobias Wolff spends “months on each story,” working through “many, many drafts.” Reviewers have described his work as “spare, cool, lucid prose, without gimmicks or artifice” and having “an almost muscular hardness of technique and vision.” Another review states that “Wolff crafts his best fictions in miniature, detonating his characters’ lives in the moment it takes to read a paragraph, crafting tales that turn on a single, diabolical sentence.” A developing writer studying the master can learn much through a close reading of Wolff’s epiphanies.

Derek Estes, Abilene Christian University, “On Religious Epistemology in the Churches of Christ”

Although the Churches of Christ have developed a distinct culture of attention to epistemological issues, there have been few studies of the epistemological framework that animates answers to these concerns. It is my view that the tradition’s significant emphasis on apologetics, debate, knowledge of absolute truth, and highly developed exegetical philosophies are tightly connected to the tradition’s religious epistemology. Therefore, in order to understand this religious epistemology, I closely analyze and critique in this paper the epistemology of one prominent philosopher in the tradition: Thomas B. Warren.

Katherine Frye, Pepperdine University, “Nature Deficit-Disorder and Pixar’s WALL-E

In Last Child in the Woods, journalist Richard Louv names the malaise impacting many children today: nature-deficit disorder .Three years after the publication of Louv’s manifesto, the film WALL-E was released. Filled with apocalyptic imagery of a planet wrecked by consumerism, WALL-E is a Louvian dystopia, a post-Earth world populated with nanny bots, hover chairs, and humans suffering from physical and emotional atrophy. But WALL-E is less a cautionary tale and more a call to arms. I argue that Andrew Stanton’s film both illustrates our current zeitgeist of anxious environmentalism while also offering its intended demographic--that is, children--a blueprint for restoring humans to nature.

Leah I. Fullman, Faulkner University, "Unlocking the Cage: An Apology for Health Sciences Programs and Biblical Principles"

Men and women past and present have longed to return to a sense of wholeness by disciplining their bodies, training their minds, and shaping their environment. Traditionally, this longing has expressed itself in the dual practices of healthcare and religion. Only in the last century the practice of separating physical health from spirituality has taken over healthcare systems in highly developed nations of the West. Health Science programs at Christian Universities are ideal environments for meeting the spiritual and physical needs of the community through campus-operated clinics, and for training students to serve the world spiritually the physical healing process.

Steven Tramel Gaines, University of Memphis and Cordova Church of Christ, Memphis, TN, “#BlackLivesMatter in The Christian Chronicle”

Fifty years after the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr., his words speak to the Churches of Christ. This essay analyzes two public letters published by The Christian Chronicle in 2016. In them 79 leaders and educators challenged the Churches of Christ to think, speak, and act more justly regarding interracial relations. The authors’ prophetic rhetoric drew from historical foundations, including King. In calling for change, the authors considered their readers’ discomfort with communication about racial inequality.

Sarah Gibson, Lipscomb University, “Cultivating Curiosity Through Research”

Every university contains hidden gems in their special collections. These gems are primary resources, often-unique first-person accounts. Getting undergraduate students interested in researching these gems can be challenging. The partnership between librarians and professors is a critical component in order to create a supportive and challenging environment for the student to not only conduct research but also to excel and to thrive. This paper examines how over three years, Lipscomb University’s Beaman Library Special Collections utilized one collection to cultivate curiosity and a love for research in an undergraduate class and how these techniques could be used across multiple disciplines.

Kenneth Gilmore, Navarro College and Southwestern Christian College, “Developing A Public Theology in African American Churches of Christ.”

In this paper I will discuss why African American Churches of Christ have been silent on the issue of race, Black Lives Matter and any other social justice issue. It is my claim that this lack of non-engagement arises out of a flawed hermeneutics developed by Alexander Campbell and adopted by Marshall Keeble.

Heather Gorman, Johnson University, “The Church and the Academy in the Christian Churches/Churches of Christ: Antagonistic, Apathetic, or Amicable?”  

The relationship between the church and the academy in the Christian Churches/Churches of Christ is complicated. That complication is rooted in the larger Stone-Campbell Movement's ambivalent history of higher education, where a respect for learning has existed alongside anti-intellectual tendencies. This paper looks at key dimensions of that relationship—members who are active in the larger biblical/theological academy, the place of Christian universities and seminaries in the tradition, how churches view scholarship, and how scholars view churches—and finds various, sometimes contradictory, expressions of that relationship: some amicable, some ambivalent, and some antagonistic.

Rachel Gould, Vanderbilt University, “John Hawkesworth and the Pursuit of Truthful Fiction”

In Almoran and Hamet (1761), John Hawkesworth explores how fantastical fictions, like the oriental tale, can better relate truth than realistic fictions. Projecting Christian virtues onto a Muslim world, Hawkesworth depicts twin brothers fighting for the Persian sultanate. As these brothers can switch bodies due to the interference of a genii, identities are blurred and physical bodies are distrusted so that the truth of each person can only be reveals through attention to their actions. For Hawkesworth, the seemingly untruthful oriental tale likewise reveals truths about the human situation through its emphasis on causality and action.

Chelsia Harris, Lipscomb University, “Compassion Fatigue is Crippling Health Care – Is Daily Spiritual Experience the Antidote?”

The Lord said “rise in the presence of the aged, show respect for the elderly and revere your God” (Leviticus 19:32, ESV).  However, neglect, devaluation, abuse, injury and even death of older adults, specifically those residing in nursing homes is all too common. Compassion fatigue is often linked with such devastation, and is increasingly prevalent among health care providers working in long-term care. This phenomenon is crippling humans’ capacity to love, nurture, or care for others. This session will discuss evidence supporting Daily Spiritual Experience with God as a potential preventative or antidote to compassion fatigue.

Tanya Hart, Pepperdine University, “Where were the Women? Reinserting Women’s Bodies into the ‘Curse of Ham’ and Constructions of Race in the 17th -19th Century”

Scholars of the Curse of Ham have incorrectly removed women’s bodies from the construction of racialized slavery that occurred during the 17th -19th centuries, when pro-slavery white Christians justified enslaving blacks as God-ordained by misinterpreting Genesis 9:18-27 and misidentifying blacks as descendants of Noah’s post-diluvian curse on Ham’s son, Canaan. In this paper, I reinsert women’s bodies into 17th -19th century constructions of slavery, arguing that white Christian pro-slavery adherents used the Curse of Ham more as a justification and foundation for whiteness/white superiority than blackness/black inferiority.

Susan Haynes, Sarah Gibson, and Elizabeth Rivera, Lipscomb University, “The Secret Sisterhood of Shame”

As we move towards inclusive environments, it is important to note the unique challenges faced by an increasingly gender diverse faculty. For women, these challenges are particularly encumbering during the motherhood stage of life. This non-survey qualitative paper will explore these challenges and offer recommendations to better accommodate and equip this growing population of faculty.

Paul Howard, Oklahoma Christian University, “Baseball in a College Statistic Course”

Baseball provides a fascinating context for the teaching and learning of statistics in an introductory course. There is a vast amount of easily obtained data sets and open source software packages to implement a wide range of baseball studies into an introductory, college level statistics course. Two major themes will be addressed in this paper. Firstly, there will be a discussion focused on a critical review of Jim Albert’s textbook, Teaching Statistics using Baseball, (2017). Secondly, personal experiences of using baseball as a context in a college level statistics course will be discussed. 

Victor L. Hunter, South Broadway Christian Church (Disciples of Christ), Denver, Colorado, “Rubem Alves and Theopoetics”

Rubem Alves (1933-2014), Brazilian theologian, philosopher, poet and psychoanalyst, was one of the first voices in the articulation of liberation theology and an early advocate and practitioner of a theopoetic methodology in reading texts and perceiving theological understanding.  Vic Hunter was his student at Union Theological Seminary in New York and became a life-long friend.  This paper explores the background and nature of a theopoetic methodology and its promise for epistemology in hearing written texts and the living voice of the people in a democratization of God-talk. 

McGarvey Ice, Abilene Christian University, “Hearts Aflame for the Salvation of Israel: The Nashville Churches of Christ Hebrew Mission, 1928–1931”

Established in 1928, the Nashville Hebrew Mission was a focused outreach to Jews that built on an earlier similar effort in Dallas.  This paper examines the context of the mission, its leading personnel and sponsors, its activities and results, and its ultimate demise just three years later.  It describes the method of outreach, the content of the message, and how it was similar to and differed from other missions to Jews, both Stone-Campbell ones and other Protestant traditions in the first half of the twentieth century.

Joshua Ward Jeffery, University of Tennessee—Knoxville,  “‘Christian Principles in the New World Order’: The League of Nations Controversy and the Stone-Campbell Movement”

In 1917, the Churches of Christ were the largest peace church in America, but government persecution during World War I heavily damaged its tradition of Christian non-resistance. The Disciples of Christ, meanwhile, largely supported the war, but slowly began to embrace pacifism after the conflagration. Members of both groups, however, were highly conflicted about the prospect of the U.S. entering the League of Nations at war’s end. Examining the clash of words over the League that erupted in Stone-Campbell movement periodicals, this paper considers how WWI affected the subsequent belief and practice of both churches.

Patrick Johnson, First Presbyterian Church, Asheville NC, “Preaching With the Choir”

The wider context of the American church is now a missionary one, which has wide-ranging implications for preaching. One basic implication is that we must now understand the gathered congregation as the primary agent of proclamation, and preaching as a special form of proclamation within the congregation, that centers, contextualizes, and kindles the multi-form witness of the community. This is a shift from our dominant images of preaching, all of which cast preaching as a solo performance. Preaching is, inescapably, a solo performance; but the soloist is surrounded by a choir – the congregation – and the audience is the wider world.

Nancy Shankle Jordan, Louisiana State University – Shreveport, “‘The Awful Grace of God’ in William Kent Krueger’s Ordinary Grace: A Novel

In this coming-of-age story set in 1960s, William Kent Krueger relates events surrounding three deaths in a small Minnesota town as well as the faith and healing that follow. Krueger weaves themes of sin, forgiveness, and redemption throughout the novel from the viewpoint of his thirteen-year-old narrator, Nathan Drum, the son of a Methodist minister. Told in a reflective, lyrical style by a mature Nathan, young Nathan is both observer and participant in the events that he relates. In the end, Nathan learns about God’s “awful grace” through his family’s and his community’s responses to the deaths.

Caleb Kersey, Freed-Hardeman University, Biological, Physical, and Human Sciences (Darren Heintzman and C. Korsi Dumenyo, co-authors), “A putative Sodium Sulfate Symporter Mutant of Pectobacterium carotovorum has Altered Virulence Characteristics”

Pectobacterium carotovorum is a bacterium that causes soft-rot disease in a variety of crops. This pathogen produces and secretes plant cell wall-degrading enzymes. Although a number of factors related to the disease-causing process have been elucidated, many questions remain. We utilized random mutagenesis to identify genes involved in pathogenesis. We isolated a hypervirulent strain that harbors a mutation near an uncharacterized gene referred to as nssA. Investigations are ongoing to explore the role of NssA in the disease-causing process of the plant pathogen P. carotovorum.

David Kneip, Abilene Christian University, “‘Living Statues of the Lord’: Clement of Alexandria and His Response to Judaism and Greco-Roman Religion”

This paper explicates Clement's usage of the “living statue” motif, arguing that the metaphor is intentionally chosen as a response to and transformation of two traditions: the Jewish prohibition of “graven images,” and the statuary characteristic of Greco-Roman religion. I contend that Clement’s curious phrase is a powerful example of his response to his environment: a metaphor that neither rejects that environment out of hand nor leaves it as it is, but rather accepts one feature of it and then adapts that feature in the service of communicating Christian truth.

Mason Lee, Princeton Theological Seminary, “Learning to Speak of God: Patience as Method in Homiletical Reasoning”

What significance does the virtue of patience have for one’s engagement in the practice of preaching? Putting the virtue of patience in conversation with the theological dialectic of Karl Barth, this paper argues patience holds a methodological function for the theological task of preaching. This paper suggests that in the preacher’s task and calling to “speak of God,” the virtue of patience – exercised interpretively, performatively, and eschatologically – protects the hope that God will speak through the words of the sermon without turning those words into an idol, resulting in ever deeper and more faithful preaching.

Jared Looney, Global City Mission Initiative, The Bronx, NY, “Global Shifts and Implications for Missions”

Urbanization and globalization are twin forces shifting the landscape of global missions, and international migration continues to keep the world in motion. While the center of Christianity shifts to the Global South, the emergence of post-Christendom generates new challenges for the church in the West. As the context for mission continues to experience seismic shifts, many in the church struggle to engage as an evangelistic presence. This presentation will explore the implications, challenges, and opportunities for missions due to the shifting context for missions engagement.

David Mahfood, “The Truth of All Things is Found in the Word: A Reflection on Anselm’s Christological Account of Truth”

Several of Anselm’s treatises offer rich theological reflection on the connection between universal and particular. For Anselm, the truths of things exist in Christ, the Father’s Word or utterance, and injustice is a falling away from the truth into falsehood. In Christ, the truth of human nature is uttered anew into history in a particular human life, though this utterance gains a tragic inflection, spoken into a world of injustice. Nonetheless, this particular utterance of transcendent truth restores justice. In this paper, I develop this line of thought, then consider its implications for contemporary reflection on truth and particularity.

Dennis Marquardt, Abilene Christian University, “Including the Outsider:  How Leader Other Group Orientation Relates to Ethical Leadership and Important Work Outcomes” (Pecha Kucha)

Being an outsider in the workplace often results in an employee feeling disillusioned and disengaged.  Scholars have identified negative dysfunctional work-related outcomes that result when employees feel different from the dominant culture at work.  With the rapidly diversifying global labor force, organizations that were largely monoracial and monocultural are now hiring employees from different racial and ethnic backgrounds.  As racial and ethnic minorities enter organizations, it is likely to result in feelings of social periphery or detachment.  This Pecha Kucha presentation highlights two studies exploring what leaders can do to reduce the negative categorization effects associated with surface-level demographic differences.

Dale Martin, Yale University, “Pedagogy of the Bible and Episcopalian Education”

It has been 10 years since the publication of my book, The Pedagogy of the Bible, in which I examined the ways in which students were taught to read scripture. While the historical-critical method has held sway for the better part of the 20th century, curriculum has begun to include theologically-oriented methods of reading texts. I argued that this move toward theological readings of texts would be both more theoretically holistic and practical. In this essay I will reflect on the findings and arguments of that book in light of the decade that has passed and Episcopalian educational strategies.

Hope A. Martin, Abilene Christian University, "Innovation and Implementation of 3D Printing for Occupational Therapy within the Medical Field"

This presentation is to showcase 3D printing literature in medicine and occupational therapy (OT) and to encourage increased exploration of 3D printing in OT education and practice. An extensive literature review was conducted exploring 3D printing technology in educational settings, medical settings, and OT practice and multiple articles were reviewed discussing the use of 3D printing technology in the medical field. Minimal documentation demonstrates how 3D printing is implemented into medical field curricula. In medicine, it is cost-effective and reduces manufacturing time however, many challenges remain including inadequate not adequate numbers of 3D printing files accessible for current rehabilitative use.

Kenneth Mayer, Lipscomb University, “Forgiveness in the Age of Social Media” (Pecha Kucha)

Today we are facing different issues surrounding forgiveness in the age of social media. A site like Facebook has 2 billion active users and we have a generation of 18-29 year olds that have 100% ownership of a smartphones. Forgiveness, however, has been around since before Jesus spent his life on Earth. The idea of forgiveness has not changed but has a bit different meaning for the public with social media. This talk will discuss what social media is and how forgiveness has changed.

Blake McAllister, Hillsdale College, “Perspectives on the Problem of Evil:  The Need for Theodicy”

I argue that we cannot assess the rational force of the problem of evil without taking into account one’s individual perspective.  For instance, whether evil disconfirms theism plausibly depends on how well or poorly God’s existence appears to explain observed evils—something that can and does differ greatly between subjects with different perspectives.  Reflection on this fact should lead Christians to prioritize theodicy. Theodicy has the potential to shift the subject towards a theistic perspective, while merely trumpeting our incapacity to fully understand God does little to change how one views the world.

Mendy McClelland, Harding University, “Christian Perspectives on Stewarding Finite Resources in the Care of Vulnerable Populations in Rural Medicine”

Rural healthcare in the United States can present many challenges for providers related to caring for those living in poverty. Limited access to transportation, costs of care, lower rates of health literacy, and less access to specialty care are just a few of these challenges. Christian healthcare providers have a God-given responsibility to care for the vulnerable and those living in poverty, but resources in rural areas of the United States are often limited. This session will describe how Christian healthcare providers can balance the stewardship of finite resources and the responsibility to care for vulnerable populations.

Patrick Messer, First Plymouth Church, Lincoln NE, “Dear Seminary”

In 2008, I came to you with nothing but a frightening conviction that God was calling me to vocational ministry. You told me that your duty was to train people to serve God with competence and faithfulness. So, I entrusted my malleable heart, mind, and finances into your degree program. In exchange, you promised to equip me to think, exegete, contextualize, preach, and pastor. It has been nearly 7 years since you handed me a diploma. Since then, I have served in 2 local churches, and I’ve thought about ways we could have done better. Let’s talk.

Charles Moore, The Mount Community, Esopus, NY, “Radical, Communal, Bearing Witness: The Church as God’s Mission in Bruderhof Perspective and Practice”

Much attention has been given to the interrelationship between the church as community and the church’s missional task. Ecclesial, liturgical, and formational concerns define the former, while strategy, messaging, and contextualization characterize the latter. Elaine Heath, Larry Duggins and others find the monastic impulse a helpful articulation for a renewed vision of the church’s missional task. Others are drawn to neo-Anabaptist configurations. The Bruderhof, a communal church movement, neither conflates nor separates the communal and missional nature of the Church. Drawing more directly from the Sermon on the Mount and the early church’s eschatological dynamic, it seeks to “restore” a more integral and socially dynamic understanding of “church,” one that in daily life bears witness to God’s new social order.

Kaylynn Myers, Kunming, Yunnan, China “The Harlot of the Promised Land: Rahab in Early Christian Thought”

The biblical figure “Rahab the Harlot” endures beyond her brief account at the outset of the conquest narratives to embed herself in early Christian exegetical imagination. Besides three references to her in the New Testament, patristic writers mention Rahab more than twenty times, in Syriac, Greek and Latin, from the first to fourth centuries, in a broad array of thematic contexts. This paper explores the range of interpretive meanings the Fathers assign to Rahab, the typology of various elements of her story, and the wide appeal this particular character had for Christian proclamation.

Bryan Nash, Lipscomb University, “The Scripture Reading and Sermon as Conversation Partners”

Public reading is an act of interpretation. This being the case, if someone other than the preacher reads the text for the sermon, the public reading might offer an interpretation of the text that contradicts the sermon. In light of this realization, who should read the sermon text? This paper looks to recent homiletical interest in conversation to suggest a way in which the reading of the text and the preaching of the text can be understood as being in conversation with one another.

Kam Nola, Lipscomb University, “Faith Perspectives in Service to Vulnerable Populations”

The purpose of the Pharmacy Management of Vulnerable and Underserved Populations elective course at the Lipscomb University College of Pharmacy is to improve the understanding of the role of the pharmacist on the inter-professional patient care team. The course is based on principles of care, policies affecting access and care provision, and various populations. Students complete an “Adopt-A-Community” project over the course of the semester that involves target population identification, needs assessment, intervention planning and execution, outcomes assessment, and results presentations to the class and college.  Discussion of community partnerships and populations impacted will be discussed.

Katrina J. Olson, Vanderbilt University, “Preaching in an Age of Alternative Facts: Communally Embodying Paradigms of Truth”

The craft of preaching attempts to linguistically proclaim deep truths, but how is this possible in a postmodern era where language is increasingly suspect and individual experience is the ultimate source of truth? This essay will seek to address this problem by examining four potential facets of the homiletical identity: claiming truth through paradigmatic imagination, connecting language to embodiment, putting claimed truth into deep dialogue, and appealing to communal identity. Through this I hope to demonstrate that the preacher needs to approach the pulpit ready to claim a communal embodied truth that constantly seeks after a paradigmatic understanding of the kingdom of God.

Daniel OvertonFreed-Hardeman University, “Pacifism after Pearl Harbor: Foy E. Wallace Jr. Changes His Mind”

In a tradition often plagued by doctrinal perfectionism, prominent Restorationist voice Foy Wallace did something difficult: publicly changed his mind. Specifically, Wallace reversed his position on the Christian’s relationship to government and to violence, converting from pacifism to militarism. Following Pearl Harbor, Wallace commenced a campaign to exterminate pacifism from Churches of Christ, alienating longtime friends while joining the overwhelming majority of fellow American Christians. This paper explores Wallace’s shift, connects his crusade against pacifists to previous attacks on “Bollism” and the Stone-Lipscomb wing, and considers the rhetorical constraints of personal transformation in an ecclesial tradition prioritizing homogeneity and stability.

Jared Poole, University of Utah, “Mo’ Faith, Mo’ Problems?” 

Over 25 years after Nkomo traced management scholars’ tendency to marginalize the study of race, the problem remains. Researchers continue to use race as a binary variable, rather than as a core construct that helps to constitute organizations in racialized societies. I argue this failure is partially due to neglect of Black religious life. By ignoring a potent cultural resource Black Americans developed to survive, research has an impoverished view of the central role race plays in organizations. I argue that the Black prophetic tradition; treatment of sociological and psychological phenomena; and expression in media are well-suited for management research.

Scott T. Prather, Baylor University, “Contending for the Truth: Premillennialism, churches of Christ, and the Gospel Advocate”

This paper examines the arguments made in the Gospel Advocate from 1915 to 1940 against premillennialism. Churches of Christ were engaged in a debate over premillennialism that resulted in its renunciation by most congregations. I will focus on three arguments: 1) Premillennialism undermined the primitivist call to restore New Testament Christianity. 2) The hermeneutic used to support premillennialism undermined a plain, common-sense reading of scripture. 3) Premillennialists were willing to sacrifice Christian unity for the sake of their speculative theology

Joe Price, Whittier College, “The Grace of the Game: An Aesthetic and Theological Appreciation of Baseball”

Austin Gisriel avers that “baseball is mysticism, not theology” because “the hold that baseball has on people is best explained anecdotally, not academically.” This presentation addresses the beguiling hold of baseball on its faithful followers by analyzing how “visual anecdotes” about baseball employ various theological concepts to explain the game’s significance and its allure.  Using cartoons and comic strips about baseball (especially ones by Charles Schultz, Jeff MacNelly, and Steve Moore), the presentation analyzes how this artistic medium interprets various theological concepts, such as creation, sin and guilt, and eschatology.  The presentation concludes with reflections on the comic experience of “the momentary grace of order” (as the poet Donald Hall has observed) that baseball provides.

Paul Prill, Lipscomb University, “LGBTQ Students at Faith-Based Colleges and Universities”

After a brief survey of the special challenges facing Christian students who are LGBTQ, this paper explores the factors that contribute to the success or failure of LGBTQ students at Christian post-secondary schools: the impact of Title IX exemptions, issues of transgender, and renewed/continuing interest in reparative therapy. The paper then charts the ways that external social pressures and internal theological/hermeneutical disagreements are likely to shape the future for Christian LGBTQ students and the Christian colleges they attend. The paper concludes with an appeal for tolerance based on Christian thinking/history other culture-war issues. 

Micki Pulleyking, Missouri State University, “Johnny Cash: Wrestling with Questions of the Divine, Desire, and Death”

Artist, Johnny Cash (1932-2003), knew suffering. Little has been written about Cash as a theologian. This presentation will explore Cash's contributions to theopoetics by focusing on his poetry, and songwriting (words and video clips). According to theologian Paul Tillich, the central question of every philosophical inquiry is what it means to be a finite human. Cash sings of the anxiety of emptiness, guilt, and death. Cash’s songs reflect a raw and deep desire to connect to God (spiritual), to each other (bodies) and to hope for redemption in the face of death. 

Leslie Reed, Abilene Christian University, “Presentation Title: Insects, Identity, and the De-individualization of the Other: The Language of Xenophobia in Ender’s Game and Starship Troopers

Giant alien bugs are sci-fi shorthand for The Other – a shocking, starkly differing, other – an instant us-versus-them scenario. Pitting humanity against a race of giant insects, Ender’s Game (Hood, 2013) explores the lengths to which a frightened humanity would go in purported self-preservation. This paper considers the rhetoric of xenophobia and the ‘othering’ in Ender’s Game as well as in Starship Troopers (Verhoeven, 1997). These sci-fi representations of othering and utter prejudice may find startling relevance, both in today’s political rhetoric and in the heart of anyone who has ever found themselves searching for a sense of belonging.

Brad Reid, Lipscomb University, “The First Amendment and Freedom of Religion”

This paper examines the Supreme Court's application of the  First Amendment's  Establishment and Free Exercise clauses in the context of religion in public schools, public displays and prayers, and employment. He will briefly discuss the historical context of the First Amendment and subsequent developments in the U.S. such as the precedent creating actions of the LDS and Jehovah Witnesses religions. 

Brad Reid, Lipscomb University, “The Foundations of the US Legal System”

It is easy to overlook how Biblical and Enlightenment concepts influence the development of the contemporary U.S. legal system. Numerous doctrines that are unconsciously accepted are illustrated in this paper. The audience is encouraged to think about how ancient Biblical and philosophical ideas are foundational to the emergent truth of their disciplines.

Brad Reid, Lipscomb University, “Is the Constitution a Sponge or a Stone?”

As U.S. law develops, a basic decision is how to interpret the U.S. Constitution. A sponge absorbs from its surroundings – the emerging environment. Contemporary influences matter. A stone is self-contained and unchanging – taking nothing from the emerging environment. It is fixed at the time or creation. This paper presents fourteen ways to understand and interpret the U.S. Constitution. Textual rules of interpretation matter, be it the Bible or a secular document. The audience will be conscious of the “unconscious” attitudes that influence U.S. Supreme Court decisions.

Lamar Reinach, Lubbock Christian University, “Seeing Through Failure: Studying Excellent Leadership in the Midst of Defeat” 

This paper offers arguments for studying leadership excellence that emerged in the crucible of organizational defeat.  I focus on examples in which failure is primarily due to the external environment rather than to internal, self-inflicted failures. Excellent performance as a leader in the midst of organizational defeat also reveals important attributes and/or practices. This issue seems especially pertinent to Christian business scholars. The message of a crucified messiah inverts the “normal” worldly standards of success. Consequently, Christian scholars may find an understanding of excellent leadership in the midst of defeat helpful in their spiritual journeys and their work as educators.

Gailyn Van Rheenen, Atlanta, GA, Presenter, “The Essence of Renewal; the Anatomy of Decline: Ten Priority Questions for Renewal”

We know that Churches of Christ are in sharp decline in North America. We also know that God, the Source of renewal, is present in His Holy Spirit. In pursuing renewal for our churches, we therefore discern answers from Scripture to ten primary theological and ministry questions for church renewal.

Dan Rodriguez, Pepperdine University Presenter, “Diaspora Missions in an Anti-immigrant Context: A Hispanic Evangelical Perspective”

This paper will address the impact of policies and politics in the age of Trump on evangelical mission efforts among Latinos in the U.S. Furthermore, and perhaps more importantly, this paper will reveal why and how the Hispanic evangelical church is well situated to critique and redefine the meaning and character of evangelical missions in the wake of the 2016 presidential election.

Hans J. Rollmann, Memorial University of Newfoundland, “Robert Henry Boll and the Nashville Bible School”

Robert Henry Boll (1875-1956), the pivotal figure among Church of Christ Premillennialists, obtained his religious training as a student at the Nashville Bible School, where he also served on the faculty as instructor of German and French. In my paper, I will argue that he received major theological impulses for his subsequent teaching and ministry under his teachers at NBS. He also started his preaching and publishing career there and established a network of life-long friends. Based on archival and printed sources, the paper explores Boll’s personal presence, activities and formative theological influences at NBS from 1895-1900.

Chris Rosser & Tamie Willis, Oklahoma Christian University, “Safe at Home: Co-curricular Spaces for Generative, (un)Safe Conversations”

Third space describes an intentional space where normative assumptions are challenged by shared encounter with cultural and ideological otherness; third spaces open possibilities for transformational education. Beam Library at Oklahoma Christian University generates third space experience through co-curricular events that engage the intersection of faith and culture. Specifically, our Safe at Home chapel exists as a generous (un)safe space that facilitates crucial conversation about gender, sexuality, and faith, empowering students who may feel unsafe because they are or affirm LGBTQIA individuals. Librarians discuss and demonstrate the educational and culture-transforming potential of a co-curricular third space.

Mark Royce, George Mason University, “Christian Democracy and National Security: The Theory and Practice of Reformed Catholicism on Questions of State Power and Violence”

Royce's research identifies and discusses what is known as Christian Democratic philosophy in the resurrection of postwar Europe by appeal to Jacques Maritain, Josef Pieper, and Paul Ricœur in addition to the transformative results of the Second Vatican Council (1962-65). It then turns to the world-historical influence of lifelong Christian Democrats Alcide De Gasperi, Dr. Konrad Adenauer, and Robert Schuman in the rebuilding of Europe prior to taking up several urgent questions of policy relevance for the European Communities.

Gary Selby, Emmanuel Christian Seminary, Milligan College, “‘For the Least of These’”: The Scandal of Poverty in the World House”

This essay explores Martin Luther King’s use of systems theory as a rhetorical frame for provoking urgency in response to the plight of the poor. I argue that using the language of systems, King situated hearers within a complex, symbolic web of economic, social, and spiritual interconnectedness where the well-being of one was integrally tied to the well-being of all. This symbolic construction of reality, I conclude, provided the basis for his call to alleviate poverty, but also undergirded his prophetic warnings about the consequences that would come if society ignored this dire threat to its own welfare. 

Nathan Shank, Oklahoma Christian University, “Style Is Work: The Reader’s Role in Representation from Paul Auster to The Binding of Isaac”

Some literary works do not merely let the reader understand characters’ feelings and motivations or take the reader through plots, but make the reader do a similar kind of work to that of the characters. I show how in Paul Auster’s novella City of Glass the reader is forced to go through the same confusion as the narrator; likewise, I take this same method of interpretation and apply it to The Binding of Isaac, in which the reader is implicated in the story just as is Abraham. Both these experiences are elicited through the particular style of those works.

Eddie Sharp, University Avenue Church of Christ, “Navigating Being Church: The Place of Scholarship in the Stability of the Church”

Churches have many influences offering to shape them. The churches in the Stone-Campbell tradition have some DNA that affirms the value of scholarship and other DNA that is suspicious of its value. In our present situation, a changing cultural landscape tempts all churches to choose new strategies for survival. Some of these paths are noble; others are less than the Kingdom of God might reflect. This paper will reflect on the challenges facing churches and on meaningful ways to integrate meaningful scholarship with renewal strategies and Christian tradition to move toward vibrant church life.

Taten Shirley, Faulkner University, “Aristotelian Truth in Virginia Woolf’s Mrs. Dalloway

This essay seeks to examine the emergent truth from Aristotle in the life of the main character, Clarissa Dalloway, from Virginia Woolf’s novel, Mrs. Dalloway. Woolf presents Dalloway as a high-class, yet superficial woman in 1920s London. One inescapable impression is that, like many of the other characters, she is not happy. What she seems to be missing as she goes throughout her day preparing for a party while reflecting on the past is what Aristotle argued makes a person happy: virtue.

Phil Slate, Harding School of Theology, “The Effects of Premillennial Eschatology on Missions by Churches of Christ in North America: 1892-1970”

Though various eschatological views are found among early nineteenth century North American restorationists, a specific form of premillennialism emerged early in the twentieth century and became the chief point of tension among churches of Christ between WWI and WWII. The issue affected fellowship among churches and found expression in specific periodicals and one college. This paper focuses specifically on the effects of premillennial eschatology on missions efforts by churches of Christ between 1892 and 1970. Was that eschatological outlook motivational? Did the emphasis impede or increase global work?

Michelle D. Steele, Lipscomb University, “De-Coding and Working Within the African American Community”

Culture-centered change around design, implementation, and evaluation of programs can be an arduous and complex task for those who are outside of, but working in communities different from their own. The consequences of not doing this well can be profound. The “outsider” seeking, specifically, to engage African American communities must contend with this and other challenges to decoding and working in and with community. Decades of unrest and very little movement on social equity and justice in these communities requires understanding of the history, needs and desires of the community. Participants in the session will hear themes of unsuccessful campaigns and explore principles of successful engagement.

Marcia R. Straughn, Abilene Christian University, "Faith and Affective Learning in Health Sciences Programs"

The development of professional values is integral to education in the Health Sciences and may be advanced through the affective domain of learning. Affective learning (dealing with feelings, values, motivations, and attitudes) may be overlooked in favor of the mastery of psychomotor skills and the cognitive requirements of exam preparation. Faith-based programs can promote the application of Christian values, beliefs, attitudes, and motivations through high-impact learning activities that target the affective domain of learning. This presentation will discuss affective learning activities in a baccalaureate nursing curriculum, with a discussion of possible application across the Health Sciences.

Michael Strickland, Amridge University and Father Stephen DeYoung, Archangel Gabriel Orthodox Church, Lafayette, LA, “‘Reasons Why I Hate The Synagogue’: John Chrysostom’s Anti-Jewish Rhetoric in Context”

Two opinions of Chrysostom are almost universally held. First, that he was possibly the greatest Christian preacher of antiquity, and second, that he was a rabid anti-Semite. This presentation addresses the second assumption by placing Chrysostom's rhetoric in the context of Antioch and against the background of three centuries of Jewish/Christian/Pagan polemics. While Chrysostom’s comments can be jarring to the modern reader, they reflect a deliberate rhetorical approach to change his congregation’s mind. His words demonstrate not only invective, but theological conviction, at a time when the ultimate triumph of Christianity in the Roman empire was still in doubt.

John Struloeff, Pepperdine University, “Spiritual Crisis in the Short Fiction of Tobias Wolff”

The world of Tobias Wolff is far ranging: in terrain – the Pacific Northwest, the desert southwest, the Deep South, Vietnam, England; in socioeconomics – the wealthy, the struggling middle class, those on the verge of destitution; and in the premise of the story – abusive hunters, a poor mother showing her son a life they can’t afford, a chain of revenge that rattles through a community. Within the beating heart of each story, however, is a spiritual crisis that the characters must face to finally glimpse the truth of their lives.

Rustin Suray, University of Mississippi, “An Analysis of External Aid and Internal Armed Conflict”

Suray's research explores how the end of the Cold War impacted countries receiving aid from the two superpowers of the 20th century, asking whether the breakup of the Soviet Union affected the countries it supported differently than those supported by the United States. Suray studies the relationship between external aid and internal armed conflict by exploiting the sudden stoppage of aid to some countries following the collapse of the Soviet Union. It uses a difference-in-difference estimator to determine if countries that stopped receiving external aid from the Soviet Union after it collapsed saw a rise in domestic instability.

David R. Swartz, Asbury University, “'De-Americanizing World Vision’: How Internationalization Reshaped Christian Mission in the 1970s"

In the 1970s the Christian humanitarian organization World Vision “de-Americanized” in what President Stanley Mooneyham called “a grand experiment.” Recipient nations from Europe, Asia, Latin America, and Africa became full partners of World Vision International. These new global voices urged a more structural approach to world hunger and poverty. By the early 1990s World Vision had transformed from an American-dominated, relief-oriented charity that focused on “simple child-care” to one that used “integrated development” to address “the causes of poverty, not merely the results.”

Kipp Swinney, Baylor University, “When Yahweh Goes to War: The Theological Implications of the Divine Warrior Motif in Prophetic Literature”

Some of the uses of the Divine Warrior motif in the Prophets correspond closely with the theological claims of the mythopoeic literature of Israel’s ancient Near Eastern milieu. Other uses, however, more innovatively deploy the motif to express competing theological understandings, which may have been distinctive claims about Yahweh. In this study, I examine three representative examples of the Divine Warrior motif in Prophetic literature, namely Isa 43:15–21, Ezek 21:6–22 [1–17], and Hab 3:2–15, all written within a relatively short time period but exhibiting a great variety of perspectives.

Stanley Talbert, Union Theological Seminary, “Redemption in Black: An Intertexual and Theological Analysis of The Shawshank Redemption and Black Mirror

This paper analyzes themes of liberation in The Shawshank Redemption and “Black Museum,” an episode from Netflix’s Black Mirror.  Through methods of intertextuality and theological analysis, the paper seeks to highlight moments of liberation through entanglement with modes of violence manifested in the prison industrial complex, lynching, racism, and the health industrial complex.  The presentation draws on the works of James Cone, emilie townes, Mark L. Taylor, and Michelle Alexander.  The goal is to show how we might imagine God in the complexities of the violence manifested in the films to inform our praxis as theological educators, clergy, religious scholars and communities of faith. T. L. Wallace, Lipscomb University, Computing & Technology, “Recent Progress on Distributions of Random Mutation Sequences”

Recent advances in single cell sequencing techniques have potential to provide further insights into molecular clock and cancer mutation processes for ensembles. One goal of this ongoing research effort is to find a provable theorem on the expected distribution of eigenvalues for a simple binary tree model of independent and identically distributed random vectors, previously observed to emerge in linear subspaces. The feasibility to infer a sample ensemble mutation or quasi molecular clock rate is to be considered. A brief overview of the theoretical foundation and progress of this work will be presented.

James E. Walters, Rochester College, “The Reception of Gen. 2:7 and the Nature of the Soul in Early Christianity”

This paper explores the various ways that early Christians from different linguistic and theological contexts interpreted Gen. 2:7 as part of their beliefs about the origin and nature of the soul. In tracing the development of early Christian debates about the nature of the soul as it pertains to the interpretation of Gen. 2:7, I will also compare Christian views with both Jewish exegetes and “pagan” philosophers who advocated competing theories of the soul’s origin and characteristics. Finally, I will conclude by highlighting the use of the soul-body analogy by various authors in the post-Chalcedonian christological disputes.

Steve Weathers, Abilene Christian University, “Dark Allure: Gun Culture in the World of Tobias Wolff”

In an era plagued by mass shootings and macabre exhibitions of armed criminality, the writing of Tobias Wolff elicits renewed attention and analysis. Within both This Boy's Life and In Pharaoh's Army, published, respectively, in 1989 and 1994, firearms play a prominent and unquestionably problematic role. It is in Wolff's fiction, however, that the taut, love- and hate-fraught relationship between man and gun emerges with an eerie frisson, posing unnerving questions about the place of weaponry in the American male psyche.

G. Scott Weston, Harding University, “A Holistic Approach to End of Life Care”

What is a “good” death? Is it possible for us to “die well”? The answer to those questions depends not only upon how someone views death, but also how that individual views life and what their core values are. End-of-life care presents health care practitioners, patients, and families with a number of complex challenges and decisions. As Christians, we believe that each patient’s life has God-given value. This presentation will suggest a holistic, integrative, faith-based approach to the medical, social, legal, spiritual, and ethical issues involved at the end of life.

Nathan G. Wheeler, Liberty University, “Kaleidescope or Mosaic?: A Theological Semiotics of Emergent Complexity”

Recent scholarship in the field of emergence shows great explanatory power for scientifically mysterious phenomena, such as mind and consciousness. However, gains in explaining such particulars bring a cost to explaining the reality of general truths (such as the operation of natural regularities, or “laws”). This paper will illustrate these dynamics of emergence theory by engaging the work of two scholars: atheist theologian Robert Corrington, and naturalist philosopher Philip Clayton. While neither theorist offers a satisfactory emergentist account of truth and particularity, this paper will show that both provide resources that, when brought together, offer a promising way forward.

Linda Whitmer, Johnson University, “Motivation for Mission and the New Global Reality”

Generations have seen missional workers move across cultural boundaries motivated by the primary evangelistic desire to spread the gospel and make new disciples.  Evangelism and spreading the message were key words.  Emerging quickly today is a new paradigm that is impacting education in the missiological discipline, mission agencies, financial accountability and mission involvement.  A desire to directly and personally address evil and injustice in the world is moving to the foreground of missiological motivation.  Based upon interviews and focus groups with college students, this presentation examines the strengths, challenges, and weaknesses of the changing motivation of mission.

Tommy Wilson, Lipscomb University, "Unknotting the World of Topoisomerase II"

This presentation will explore research involving the pharmacology and enzymology of topoisomerase II as a cancer drug target. Additionally, the presentation will provide examples of how research experiences for undergraduate and graduate students enable students to develop skills including critical thinking, problem solving, experimental design, data analysis, and data presentation. Student researchers in biomedical science broaden their knowledgebase and open up opportunities for additional training and specializing.  The skills developed through biomedical research have led the presenter to explore nontraditional pharmacy career pathways within bioinformatics.

Click here to see the 2017 CSC Abstracts Archive.