Lipscomb University

Books

The Word Before the Powers: An Ethic of Preaching

Charles L. Campbell

PW14 Book1In this examination of the ethical significance of preaching, Charles Campbell provides both fresh insights into the relationship between preaching and ethics and a challenging moral vision for the contemporary church. Moving beyond a narrow focus on moral decision-making or social-issues sermons, Campbell argues that a particular ethic--nonviolent resistance--is inherent in the practice of preaching and shapes the moral life of the church. In the face of the powers, the fundamental ethical task of preaching involves building up the church as a community of resistance. Employing three dimensions of character ethics--vision, practices, and virtues--Campbell demonstrates the concrete ways in which preachers may undertake this task.

Preaching Fools: The Gospel as a Rhetoric of Folly

Charles L. Campbell and Johan H. Cilliers

PW14 Book2The court jesters, clowns, foolish ones: all images of the comic, sometimes tragic, fool. Across national and cultural borders, the archetype of the fool has played a significant role in how communities interpret and ascribe identity. As Charles Campbell and Johan Cilliers remind us, the Christian preacher, tasked with delivering a paradoxical gospel, is also a fool. In a delicate exploration with enlightening results, Preaching Fools uses a diverse representation of fools and foolish actions to show how modern preaching is inseparable from the folly of the cross. Campbell and Cilliers walk the fine line between the ugliness and beauty of the gospel and challenge readers toward a deeper engagement with its unsettling message.

Preaching Jesus: The New Directions for Homiletics in Hans Frei's Postliberal Theology

Charles L. Campbell

PW14 Book 3The postliberal, cultural-linguistic theology of the "Vale School" has been one of the most important theological developments in the United States during the latter Twentieth century. In this unique book, which combines theological analysis and homiletical reflection, Charles Campbell examines postliberal theology as it is embodied in the work of Hans Frei and develops the implications of this theological position for the theory and practice of preaching. Arguing that the trouble with homiletics today is fundamentally theological, Campbell offers Frei's theological position as a means for enriching the Christian pulpit and renewing the church.