Professional Year 3
 
Semester 1
 
Course
Credit Hours
2
3
3
2
3
2
1
Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience VI 0 (P/F)
2
1 (P/F)
Semester Credit Hours
19
 
Semester 2
 
Course
Credit Hours
3
3
2
3
1
3
Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience VI 0 (P/F)
2
Semester Credit Hours
17

 

Course Descriptions

Year 3 – Semester 1
 
Natural Medicines                                                                         2 Credit Hours
 
Content of course to include concepts of crude drugs; semi-purified, and purified natural products; variability of occurrence of pharmacologically active substances in plants and impact on regulatory aspects of herbal products; overview of classes of pharmacologically active natural products; dietary supplements (vitamins, minerals, and herbals); alternative medical treatments; evaluation of alternative and complementary medicine purity, bioavailability, safety, and efficacy; herbal-drug interactions; and regulation of dietary supplements and herbal products.  Back to top.
 
Pharmacotherapy III                                                                     3 Credit Hours
Course content is to be presented in modules focusing on organ systems (e.g., respiratory, cardiovascular), disease states (e.g., asthma, hypertension, heart failure, angina), or patient populations (e.g., pediatrics, geriatrics, women’s health). Modules will be sequenced so that organ systems and disease states are covered first, and then followed by unique patient populations. Content of these modules are to include pathophysiology; clinical signs and symptoms; diagnostic testing; therapeutic drug classes and literature supporting their use; principles of clinical practice guidelines for various disease states and their interpretation in the clinical setting; drug monitoring, including applied pharmacokinetics; design of patient centered, culturally relevant treatment plans; special populations; and development of treatment protocols. The course will consist of didactic lectures, case based teaching, and small group discussions. Back to top.
Pharmacotherapy IV                                                                     3 Credit Hours
Course content is to be presented in modules focusing on organ systems (e.g., renal, nutritional support, gastroenterology), disease states (e.g., renal failure, malnutrition, peptic ulcer disease), or patient populations (e.g., pediatrics, geriatrics). Modules will be sequenced so that organ systems and disease states are covered first, and then followed by unique patient populations. Content of these modules are to include pathophysiology; clinical signs and symptoms; diagnostic testing; therapeutic drug classes and literature supporting their use; principles of clinical practice guidelines for various disease states and their interpretation in the clinical setting; drug monitoring, including applied pharmacokinetics; design of patient centered, culturally relevant treatment plans; special populations; and development of treatment protocols. The course will consist of didactic lectures, case based teaching, and small group discussions. Back to top.
Medication Therapy Management                                              2 Credit Hours
 
Content of this course surrounds the understanding of the core components of Medication Therapy Management (MTM) and its implementation in the patient centered care setting. These core components include: Performing or obtaining necessary assessments of the patient’s health status; formulating a medication treatment plan; selecting, initiating, modifying, or administering medication therapy; monitoring and evaluating the patient’s response to therapy, including safety and effectiveness; performing a comprehensive medication review to identify, resolve, and prevent medication-related problems, including adverse drug events; documenting the care delivered and communicating essential information to the patient’s other primary care providers; providing verbal education and training designed to enhance patient understanding and appropriate use of his/her medications; providing information, support services and resources designed to enhance patient adherence with his/her therapeutic regimens; coordinating and integrating medication therapy management services within the broader healthcare-management services being provided to the patient. Additionally, issues surrounding the cost for providing MTM services and accompanying appropriate pharmacist reimbursement will be discussed. The course will be taught with didactic lectures, student pharmacists' presentations, and special projects where student pharmacists are mock patients on which to develop MTM strategies.  Back to top.
 
Pharmacy Practice V                                                                    3 Credit Hours
 
Content of course is to include specific issues related to community pharmacy practice such as management principles (planning, organizing, directing, and controlling resources); management of staff within the practice setting, including pharmacists, technicians, and other supportive personnel; management tools, including informatics, needed to assess and address change, increase competitiveness, improve quality, and optimize patient services; legal and ethical considerations in practice; management of medication use safety systems; strategies to improve the continuity of patient care as patients move between healthcare settings; marketing principles; basic accounting principles; project management; managed care and other third party administration; home-care and long-term care; development of patient medication profiles; identification and prevention of medication related errors; issues of distribution systems; role of automation in the practice setting; patient counseling and other communication issues; disease state management; MTM; methods of outcome monitoring and assessment techniques; and reimbursement related issues.  Back to top.
 
Pharmacy Practice IV (Pharmacoeconomics/ Health Outcomes)    2 Credit Hours
 
This course will include the economic principles that relate to pharmacoeconomic analysis; concepts of pharmacoeconomics in relation to patient care; applications of economic theories and health-related quality of life concepts to improve allocation of limited healthcare resources; application of principles of epidemiology to the study of drug use and outcomes in large populations; studies that provide an estimate of the probability of beneficial effects in populations, or the probability of adverse effects in populations, and other parameters relating to drug use benefit; evaluation of literature; concepts relating to formularies and their maintenance; and measuring health outcomes.  The course will consist of didactic lectures, self-study, case based teaching, projects, and small group discussions.  Back to top.
 
Practice Seminar I                                                                             1 Credit Hour
 
Each student pharmacist will prepare and make one twenty minute presentation before their class and faculty during the semester. Emphasis will be placed on developing and exercising group presentation skills. Student pharmacists will be expected to research and develop the scientific content of the presentation and handle questions following the presentations.    Back to top.
 
Elective(s)                                                                                           2-3 Credit Hours
 
Opportunities will be provided for students to take course work designed to develop areas of personal interest, to expand their understanding of professional opportunities, and to achieve the outcomes of the curriculum.  The College will also utilize existing courses within the University to offer as elective experiences (i.e., business management, marketing, foreign languages, informatics, or upper level science/biology).  Back to top.
 
Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience V                       0 (Pass/Fail)
               
Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experiences are designed to introduce student pharmacists to a variety of practice settings such as institutional, community, and specialty pharmacy practices.  A limited number of experiences will be performed in a simulated pharmacy environment.  Student pharmacists engaged in these experiences will demonstrate competencies that mirror the progression within the curriculum.  Concepts covered in IPPE V include more advanced demonstration of administrative and direct patient care skills.  Back to top. 
 
 
 
Applied Christian Ethics in Pharmacy                                        1 (Pass/Fail)
 
This course is a study in Christian ethics and the attitudes and values that pharmacists should exemplify in the care of patients. Topics to be explored include pain and suffering, caring and compassion and worldviews and values. It is required that each student attend the monthly lecture sessions and small group discussion meetings as well as other assignments to successfully complete the course. Back to top.
 
Total Year 3 – Semester 1                           19 - 20 Credit Hours
 
Year 3 – Semester 2
 
Pharmacotherapy V                                                                          3 Credit Hours
Course content is to be presented in modules focusing on organ systems (e.g., oncology, hematology, rheumatology), disease states (e.g., breast cancer, lung cancer, leukemia, arthritis, gout), or patient populations (e.g., pediatrics, geriatrics). Modules will be sequenced so that organ systems and disease states are covered first, and then followed by unique patient populations. Content of these modules are to include pathophysiology; clinical signs and symptoms; diagnostic testing; therapeutic drug classes and literature supporting their use; principles of clinical practice guidelines for various disease states and their interpretation in the clinical setting; drug monitoring, including applied pharmacokinetics; design of patient centered, culturally relevant treatment plans; special populations; and development of treatment protocols. The course will consist of didactic lectures, case based teaching, and small group discussions. Back to top. 

Pharmacotherapy VI                                                                         3 Credit Hours

Course content is to be presented in modules focusing on organ systems (e.g., endocrinology, reproductive systems), disease states (e.g., diabetes, thyroid disorder, eclampsia), or patient populations (e.g., pediatrics, geriatrics, women’s health). Modules will be sequenced so that organ systems and disease states are covered first, and then followed by unique patient populations. Content of these modules are to include pathophysiology; clinical signs and symptoms; diagnostic testing; therapeutic drug classes and literature supporting their use; principles of clinical practice guidelines for various disease states and their interpretation in the clinical setting; drug monitoring, including applied pharmacokinetics; design of patient centered, culturally relevant treatment plans; special populations; and development of treatment protocols. The course will consist of didactic lectures, case based teaching, and small group discussions. Back to top.
Developing Clinical Practice Skills                                                 2 Credit Hours
Using the ASHP text of the same name as the guide, this course will provide extensive training on key components of setting up a clinical practice in both institutional and ambulatory settings. Topics will include understanding patient issues; pharmacy profession and pharmaceutical care; patient-pharmacist encounters; patient records; clinical reasoning; designing and implementing the patient care plan; evaluating patient progress and outcome assessments; and utilization of drug information skills. The course will consist of didactic lectures, case based teaching, group projects, and small group discussions.  Back to top.
Pharmacy Practice VI                                                                        3 Credit Hours
Content of course is to include specific issues related to institutional (hospital, health-system) pharmacy practice such as management principles (planning, organizing, directing, and controlling resources); management of staff within the practice setting, including pharmacists, technicians, and other supportive personnel; management tools, including informatics needed to assess and address change, improve quality, and optimize patient services; legal and ethical considerations in institutional practice; management of medication use safety systems; strategies to improve the continuity of patient care as patients move between healthcare settings; marketing principles; basic accounting principles; project management; managed care and other third party administration; home care and long-term care; development of patient medication profiles; identification and prevention of medication related errors; issues of distribution systems; role of automation in the practice setting; patient counseling and other communication issues; disease state management; MTM; methods of outcome monitoring and assessment techniques; reimbursement related issues; infection control; JCAHO; sterile product preparation and dispensing; safe handling of hazardous drugs; and unique aspects of hospitals from the small community hospital to the academic health-system.  Back to top.
Practice Seminar II                                                                                  1 Credit Hour
Each student pharmacist will prepare and make one forty-five minute presentation during the semester before classmates and faculty. Emphasis will be placed on developing and exercising group presentation skills. Students will be expected to research and develop the scientific content of the presentation and handle questions following the presentations. Critical analysis and logical and persuasive presentation of the literature will be the emphasis of the class. Back to top.
Advanced Clinical Practice Skills                                                       3 Credit Hours
Content of the course to focus on developing skills in obtaining a comprehensive patient history; familiarity with basic physical assessment techniques such as assessing vital signs, HEENT assessment, integumentary assessment, thorax and lung assessment, cardiovascular assessment, abdominal assessment, musculoskeletal assessment, neurological assessment, and the changes that occur in the presence of disease or drug therapy; principles of ECG and common abnormalities; and renewal of Basic Cardiac Life Support (BCLS).  Back to top.
Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience V                             0 (Pass/Fail)
Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experiences are designed to introduce student pharmacists to a variety of practice settings such as institutional, community, and specialty pharmacy practices.  A limited number of experiences will be performed in a simulated pharmacy environment.  Student pharmacists engaged in these experiences will demonstrate competencies that mirror the progression within the curriculum.  Concepts covered in IPPE VI include more advanced demonstration of administrative and direct patient care skills.  Back to top.
Elective(s)                                                                                                 2-3 Credit Hours
Opportunities will be provided for students to take course work designed to develop areas of personal interest, to expand their understanding of professional opportunities, and to achieve the outcomes of the curriculum.  The College will also utilize existing courses within the University to offer as elective experiences (i.e., business management, marketing, foreign languages, informatics, or upper level science/biology).  Back to top.
 
Total Year 3 – Semester 2                        17 - 18 Credit Hours