Professional Year 1
 
Semester 1
 
Course
Credit Hours
3
3
3
3
2
2
2
2
0
1 (P/F)
Semester Credit Hours
21
 
 
Semester 2
 
Course
Credit Hours
3
3
3
2
3
2
2
Semester Credit Hours
18

 

Course Descriptions

Year 1- Semester 1

Physiological Basis of Therapeutics I                       3 Credit Hours
 
The first of a two course sequence designed to emphasize integrated concepts of structure (anatomy) and function (physiology) of the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems. Particular emphasis will be placed on cellular, homeostatic and control mechanisms that regulate the physiologic response of target tissues. Laboratory exercises for this course will be incorporated into the Integrated Biomedical Sciences laboratory Course and consist of directed use of anatomical models of various structures, systems and physiology simulations in a modified gross anatomy and physiology laboratory. Methods of instruction include lectures, group discussions, and independent study. Back to top.
 
Biomolecular Chemistry                                                3 Credit Hours
 
This course is designed to cover integrated concepts of human biochemistry as it relates to the synthesis, structure and function of key biomolecules (nucleic acids, amino acids, proteins, lipids and carbohydrates), membranes, cells, signal transduction processes, and metabolic pathways in physiologic systems.   Special emphasis will be placed on the comprehension of key biomolecules, cellular organelles or pathways that can be targeted or manipulated for the diagnosis, prevention, or treatment of human disease. Laboratory exercises for this course will be incorporated into the Integrated Biomedical Sciences Laboratory Course when necessary. Methods of instruction include lectures, group discussions, and independent study.  Back to top.
 
 
Microbiology/Immunology                                              3 Credit Hours
 
This course is designed to cover general principles of microbial concepts; principles of infectious disease, host-parasite relationships; viral structure and reproduction; pathogenic micro-organisms of man; inflammatory responses to infectious agents; and clinical aspects of infection. Immunology content will include discussions on human immunity and immune response; principles of antigen-antibody relationships; molecular biology of immune response; and the genetic basis for antibody synthesis, development, function, and immunopathology. Laboratory exercises for this course will be incorporated into the Integrated Biomedical Sciences Laboratory Course when necessary. Methods of instruction include lectures, group discussions, and independent study.  Back to top.
 
Pharmaceutical and Medicinal Chemistry                3 Credit Hours
 
This course is designed for the student pharmacist to develop an understanding of the physical, chemical, and pharmaceutical properties of medicinal products used in the delivery of pharmaceutical care. Course content includes general principles of thermodynamics; physical and chemical properties of molecules; particle size, shape, and surface area; kinetic, equilibrium and interfacial phenomena; principles of drug dissolution, release, and diffusion; rheologic properties of liquids, solutions, and colloidal systems; polymers and biomaterials; and drug delivery systems. The course will also introduce fundamental aspects of medicinal chemistry used in the rational design of drug molecules; molecular changes in drug molecules that affect affinity and activity at drug receptors and influence the absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, and stability of drugs; and the properties of drug molecules which are important in their formulation into drug products. Laboratory exercises for this course will be incorporated into the Integrated Biomedical Sciences Laboratory Course. Methods of instruction include lectures, group discussions, and independent study.  Back to top.
 
Integrated Biomedical Sciences Lab                          2 Credit Hours
 
The focus of this laboratory course will be to engage students in laboratory exercises, experiments and simulations that supplement and enhance didactic material in the biomedical and pharmaceutical sciences. Special emphasis will be placed on exercises, experiments and simulations that relate to the biochemical, physiological or pharmacological basis of drug discovery, formulation, disposition and response. Methods of instruction include independent and group laboratory exercises, computer simulations, and independent study.  Back to top.
 
Pharmacy Practice I                                                        2 Credit Hours
The didactic portion of this course includes an introduction to the practice of pharmacy within the major practice settings; the history of the pharmacy profession; discussion on the role of the pharmacist as a part of the health care team; the drug use process; utilization of technology and support personnel in pharmacy practice; and the provision of pharmaceutical care. The course also provides student pharmacists with certification in Basic Cardiac Life Support (BCLS) and Pharmacy- Based Immunization Delivery. Additionally, a mandatory online certification course will be completed before the student’s hospital based IPPE. This certification course will be developed in cooperation with area hospitals and will meet their legal policies and procedures for admittance in the pharmacy and patient care areas. This course will also include small group discussion sessions where students can reflect on topics from the didactic portion and relate that discussion to what they have experienced in the IPPE course. Back to top.
Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experiences I       2 Credit Hours
Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experiences are designed to introduce student pharmacists to a variety of practice settings such as institutional, community, and specialty pharmacy practices.  A limited number of experiences will be performed in a simulated pharmacy environment.  Student pharmacists engaged in these experiences will demonstrate competencies that mirror the progression within the curriculum.  Concepts covered in IPPE I will be introduction to pharmacy law, introductory drug knowledge, interprofessional interactions, and understanding the role of the pharmacist. Back to top.
 
Dean’s Hour                                                                          0 Credit Hour
 
The content of this course will focus on what it means to be a pharmacist; historical view of the profession; professionalism; attitudes and values needed in the care of patients; leadership skills; and guest speakers sharing experiences in their careers as a pharmacist.  Back to top.
 
Pharmacy Calculations                                                2 Credit Hours
 
The course is designed to enable student pharmacists to accurately perform pharmacy calculations required in pharmacy practice. Calculations taught range from dose calculations and adjustments to those necessary to compound, dispense, and administer medications. Student pharmacists will also be introduced to knowledge needed to interpret prescription and medication orders and an overview of pharmaceutical measurement. Examples of topics covered include conversion between various systems of measurement, dose calculations, calculations involving electrolytes, isotonicity calculations, intravenous flow and drip rate calculations, and calculations for altering product strength. Course material is delivered through didactic lectures and interactive workshops. The workshops encourage group-learning activities.  Back to top.
 
Applied Christian Values in Pharmacy                   1 Credit Hour
 
This course is a study in Christian ethics and the attitudes and values that pharmacists should exemplify in the care of patients. Topics to be explored include pain and suffering, caring and compassion and worldviews and values. It is required that each student attend the monthly lecture sessions and small group discussion meetings as well as other assignments to successfully complete the course.  Back to top.
 
Total Year 1 – Semester 1               21 Credit Hours
 
 
 
 
Year 1 – Semester 2
 
Physiological Basis of Therapeutics II                  3 Credit Hours
 
The second of a two course sequence designed to emphasize integrated concepts of structure (anatomy) and function (physiology) of the respiratory, cardiovascular, endocrine, digestive, urinary and reproductive systems. Particular emphasis will be placed on cellular, homeostatic and control mechanisms that regulate the physiologic response of target tissues. Laboratory exercises for this course will be incorporated into the Integrated Biomedical Sciences Laboratory Course and will consist of directed use of anatomical models of various structures, systems and physiology simulations in a modified gross anatomy and physiology laboratory. Methods of instruction include lectures, group discussions, and independent study.  Back to top.
 
Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics I             3 Credit Hours
 
The first of a three course sequence designed to emphasize principles of drug action used to characterize, evaluate and compare drug molecules in the areas of neuropharmacology, inflammation and immune pharmacology, and antimicrobial agents. Fundamental principles that will be covered in this sequence includes evaluating physical and chemical properties of drug molecules (medicinal chemistry) and drug targets (biochemistry) that regulate drug-receptor interactions, characterizing the type of drug molecules and drug targets that interact with specific cell signaling pathways (pharmacology), and understanding pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic principles that alter drug efficacy (therapeutics) or drug toxicity (toxicology). Laboratory exercises for this course will be incorporated into the Integrated Biomedical Sciences laboratory Course. Methods of instruction include lectures, group discussions, and independent study.  Back to top.
 
Biopharmaceutics                                                  3 Credit Hours
 
Content includes physicochemical principles of dosage forms; biological principles of dosage forms; principles of drug delivery via dosage forms (e.g., liquid, solid, semi-solid, controlled release, transdermal, and implants); principles of dosage form stability and drug degradation in dosage forms; materials and methods used in preparation, testing, and use of dosage forms; drug discovery and development; basic principles of in vivo drug kinetics (linear and non-linear); and principles of bioavailability/bioequivalence. Methods of instruction include lectures, group discussions, and independent study.  Back to top.
 
Dispensing Lab / Compounding                            3 Credit Hours
 
Course content and projects include U.S. Pharmacopeia guidance on compounding and FDA compliance; policy guidelines; techniques and principles used to prepare and dispense individual extemporaneous prescriptions, including dating of compounded dosage forms; liquid (parenteral, enteral), solid, semi-solid, and topical preparations; dosage form preparation calculations; sterile admixture techniques (stability and sterility dating, clean room requirements, infusion devices and catheters, and preparation and dispensing of prescriptions, including mock antineoplastic agents); interpretation of a prescription; and requirements and parts of a prescription label. Pharmaceutical calculations materials will also be a component of this course and will include the interpretation of a prescription; overview of pharmaceutical measurements; dosage calculations and adjustments in standard and special population patients; and medication administration techniques. Pharmacy students will also receive instruction relating to the calculations needed to compound standard pharmaceutical products from raw materials and commercial products and the use of mechanical and electronic balances for compounding.  Back to top.
 
Integrated Biomedical Sciences Lab                     2 Credit Hours
 
The focus of this laboratory course will be to engage students in laboratory exercises, experiments and simulations that supplement and enhance didactic material in the biomedical and pharmaceutical sciences. Special emphasis will be placed on exercises, experiments and simulations that relate to the biochemical, physiological or pharmacological basis of drug discovery, formulation, disposition and response. Methods of Instruction include independent and group laboratory exercises, computer simulations, and independent study.  Back to top.
 
 
Pharmacy Practice II                                            2 Credit Hours
This course is a continuation of the first semester Pharmacy Practice I course. The didactic portion of this course includes: an advanced analysis of the practice of pharmacy within the major practice settings; discussion on the role of the pharmacist as a part of the healthcare team; the role and importance of professional pharmacy organizations; models and sites of practice; postgraduate educational and career opportunities; an introduction to prescription handling; Top 100 drugs overview; privacy/confidentiality laws (HIPPA); and certification in immunization.   Back to top.
 Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experiences II        2 Credit Hours
Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experiences are designed to introduce student pharmacists to a variety of practice settings such as institutional, community, and specialty pharmacy practices.  A limited number of experiences will be performed in a simulated pharmacy environment.  Student pharmacists engaged in these experiences will demonstrate competencies that mirror the progression within the curriculum.  Concepts covered in IPPE II include communication skills, introductory pharmaceutical calculations and an introduction to pharmaceutical care. Back to top.
 
Total Year 1 – Semester 2                18 Credit Hours