Lipscomb University

Christian Scholars' Conference

Call for Papers

"Poster Session for Behavioral Sciences

One World: Using Research to Remap Relationships"

In disciplines that examine humans and how they interact with the world, we are aware of the impact of culture, faith, and the environment. The behavioral sciences allow us to research and study how people live and interact with others and their environment. As sojourners and fellow scholars, we understand that God calls us to live in distinctly different ways and recognize the intersections of poverty, conflict, social justice, and culture with faith and interaction with others. 

In this call for abstracts, we invite scholars in counseling, family studies, psychology, social work, sociology and related disciplines to gather June 3-5, 2015 at the Christian Scholars’ Conference at Abilene Christian University in Abilene, TX. Topics can include but are not limited to

  • Impact of technology on human interactions
  • Online and distance learning pedagogy
  • Counseling in a global community
  • Poverty and educational achievement
  • Conflict resolution in a changing world
  • Faith and wellness
  • Childcare in emerging cultures
  • Third-world kinship care of orphans
  • End-of-life care and decisions
  • Crisis management
  • Ethics in assessing non-consenting clients
  • Marital and family relationships

Please email abstracts of poster sessions (250 to 300 words) to Beth.Robinson@lcu.edu by February 28, 2015. Abstracts will undergo blind review.  We will then organize one or more sessions based on the quality and nature of submissions. Presenters must register for the conference. Please include a cover sheet with the following:

  • Your name
  • Your university affiliation
  • The poster title
  • Your contact information 

"Scientific Breakthroughs: A CSC Mini-Review Series"

The 2015 Christian Scholars Conference will host mini-review sessions in science, technology, engineering, and mathematical (STEM) disciplines.  These sessions will focus on either notable new discoveries or research progress announced in the current scientific literature. The intent of these sessions will be to inform a general academic audience of the background and core principles of the discovery. Content will be developed from the primary, peer-reviewed scientific literature, and will be presented by conference attendees with appropriate academic training for the mini-review content. Proposals will be reviewed for the scientific quality of content and the conferences capacity to provide an appropriate audience for the content. Presentations will be strictly limited to 15 minutes followed by 5-10 minutes for questions/discussion with the audience.

Proposals should include a brief (300 - 500 word) introduction of the proposed session; defining the central themes of the mini-review, and citing published sources of information that will inform the presentation. Please include your curriculum vitae with the submission of the proposal. Submissions can be emailed to Jay Brewster at jay.brewster@pepperdine.edu on or before February 6, 2015. Notice of acceptance/declination of your paper will be provided by February 13, 2015. 

“Magical Language in Literature”

The debate about the function of language is ancient: there are those who believe that language can partially construct reality, and there are those who believe that language is primarily a set of labels for objects. There are also those who believe that language can act on people; this is a magical view of language. And in fairytales, legends, and myths, language is capable of action e.g., magic passwords, spells, incantations, etc.

This panel seeks abstracts for papers addressing various and varied appearances of magical language in literature. Connections to the biblical mythos are especially welcome. Please submit 300-400 word abstracts to the panel convener by January 21. Those submitting will be notified of the status of their proposals by February 15. Completed papers are due May 5. Readings are limited to 15-18 minutes. Readers must register with the conference to present their papers.

Please send abstracts or queries to Gregory Jeffers, University of Texas at Arlington, gjeffers@uta.edu.

“Remapping Culture with Detective Fiction”

How can Christian scholars use detective fiction in their task of remapping culture? Detective genres (amateur sleuth, hard-boiled detective, police procedural, the cozy, and so forth) arose as their eras’ readers/viewers required. But crime stories are more than commodities. The unexpected popularity of Nordic NoirThe Silence of the Lambs, and re-imaginings of Sherlock Holmes, for example, are clues to culture that demand interpretation. Panelists might investigate how Christians situate such works and their cultures theologically. Does a given detective story have something to say about sin, eschatology, redemption, or other issues in the culture it represents? This peer-reviewed panel seeks three papers that explore possibilities.

Send proposals (300-400 words) and queries to Chris Willerton at willerton.chris@gmail.com by January 15. See thursday65.wordpress.com for more details and some resources. Acceptances go out by February 15. Completed papers are due May 15. Readings are limited to 15-18 minutes. Readers must register with the conference to present their papers.

“Intergenerational Tension as a Way of Understanding Multicultural Literature”

While our world comprises people from a variety of religious, racial, and national backgrounds, literature helps us understand the ways we are similar, despite these differences. Most texts characterized as “multicultural literature” emphasize these differences in race and culture, but many also include the common thread of intergenerational tension as a significant theme that helps touch a larger audience.

In “Mapping Intergenerational Tension in Multicultural Coming-of-Age Literature,” Dan Shiffman states that “the theme of intergenerational tension [is] an approach to bring students from varied cultural backgrounds together into a shared conversation” (29). For instance, in The Joy Luck Club, Amy Tan uses the tension between mothers and daughters as a way to explore cultural differences between first-generation Chinese-American immigrants and their children born in America.

We are seeking papers which explore the theme of intergenerational tension in fiction as a way of coming to a greater understanding of the many cultures of our world. Papers will also be considered that focus on using the theme of intergenerational tension in the classroom setting as a way to more deeply engage students in multicultural literature.

Email your submissions to Ronna Privett, Lubbock Christian University, at ronna.privett@lcu.edu by January 31, 2015. Only complete papers will be accepted (abstracts are not necessary). Papers should be 7-9 pages and should be able to be read in less than 15 minutes. Acceptances will be mailed by February 15. Participants must register with the conference to present their papers.

Please include a cover sheet with the following:

  • Your name
  • Your university affiliation
  • The paper title
  • Your contact information

“Universalistic Perspective of Biblical Wisdom Literature”

In conjunction with the One World theme of the 2015 CSC, a session will be devoted to the universalistic perspective of the biblical wisdom literature. Over the years, scholars have been perplexed by the lack of significant historical events or theological tenets alluded to in the wisdom literature (covenants, Exodus, God's intervention in history, Mosaic Law, etc.). Usually this less than sectarian perspective has been explained as due to the wisdom writers' diplomatic vocation or their exposure to other ancient Near Eastern wisdom literature. However, more recently other scholars have appealed to the literary and generic nature of the wisdom literature or the nature of its rhetoric to explain this. Papers are welcome that broach this topic, especially ones that provide a new angle on this issue.

Send full papers (3000 word maximum) and queries to Mark Sneed at mark.sneed@lcu.edu by February 1. Papers will be read blindly. Acceptances go out by February 15. Conference presentations of the papers are limited to 18 minutes. Readers must register with the conference to present their papers.

Doctoral Students Session #1: “Negotiating Scripture and Culture”

This session will concern the relationship between the Bible and the cultural contexts in which the Bible is read. On the one hand, this relationship raises questions about scriptural authority and interpretation in ecclesial contexts, both local and trans-congregational. On the other hand, there is no shortage of hot-button issues and pressing questions in the wider culture—whether social, moral, political, or other—that bear directly on biblical interpretation and, in turn, are directly affected by exegetical judgments. We invite PhD students (at any stage in their program) to pick a particular cultural issue or theme and explore its relationship to Scripture: problems, possibilities, histories, relevance, consequences, and so on. Students need not take a “definitive” position, but more than mere description is expected.

Email your submission to Brad East (eastbk@gmail.com). Proposals should be 300-500 words and are due by January 15. Students will receive word about their proposal by February 15. The three best proposals will be chosen in consultation with relevant faculty (through “blind” evaluation), one of whom will serve as faculty respondent in the session. The final papers will be distributed in advance to the session participants 3-4 weeks before the conference; depending on the length of papers, some may be summarized in a presentation rather than read in full. The three doctoral students whose proposals are accepted will be eligible for up to $1,000 in reimbursement for travel, lodging, and registration.

Doctoral Students Session #2: “The Church and the Churches”

This session will be devoted to the question of unity, diversity, and division in the universal church. As a tradition, Churches of Christ have a historic and laudatory emphasis on ecclesial unity, which is perhaps one of its chief contributions to the wider church. This emphasis has nonetheless taken the form, at times, of strict boundary lines drawn around the “true” church, thus leading to a sectarian inclination alongside its unitive focus. We invite PhD students (at any stage in their program) to explore these issues from whatever vantage point they so choose: the biblical witness to unity and division in the people of God; lessons from church history about the same; a theological treatment of ecclesiology; practical/pastoral discussion of the relationship between the one universal church and particular ecclesial communities and traditions; the role of Churches of Christ in this ongoing set of challenges; and more.

Email your submission to Brad East (eastbk@gmail.com). Proposals should be 300-500 words and are due by January 15. Students will receive word about their proposal by February 15. The three best proposals will be chosen in consultation with relevant faculty (through “blind” evaluation), one of whom will serve as faculty respondent in the session. The final papers will be distributed in advance to the session participants 3-4 weeks before the conference; depending on the length of papers, some may be summarized in a presentation rather than read in full. The three doctoral students whose proposals are accepted will be eligible for up to $1,000 in reimbursement for travel, lodging, and registration.

“One World? The Academy from Babel to Pentecost”

The Tower of Babel represents the dehumanizing loss of individuality and the sacrifice of genuine community. Conversely, Pentecost offers a vision of unity in diversity. There, God’s creative Spirit reverses the curse of Babel, enabling the recovery of individuality in genuine community. This session is intended to stimulate a theologically informed remapping within and across disciplines. Papers will engage the problem of Babel, as well as imaginings of Pentecost: how to break down monolithic paradigms, overcome unbridled individualism, and move towards a positive community of individuals? Sample topics include: “constructive anarchy”, “radical simplicity”, communal ethics, crowdsourcing design, “wikileaks”, peer supported healthcare, etc. Theoretical and empirical submissions from relevant disciplines are welcome, including, for example, the arts, the social sciences, theology, and literature.

For consideration by a peer-review committee, please submit a 350-word proposal to Kenny Jones at kenny.jones@acu.edu no later than January 21, 2015. Participants will be notified by February 16, 2015, of the status of their submissions. Three papers will be presented at the conference. Completed papers are due May 15. Paper presentations are limited to 15-18 minutes. Readers must register with the conference to present their papers. Session conveners will be David McAnulty, Associate Professor Psychology, ACU and Kenny Jones, Professor of Art and Design, ACU

Call for Papers - Business, Computing and Engineering Scholars

We face vexing problems and opportunities today that call for fundamental change if we are to live in ONE WORLD as God calls us to do. Failing institutions, conflict, poverty, sustainability, and social justice are just a few areas where society needs fundamental remapping to bring about significant change. In our research lives we can advance knowledge to address these problems. We also bear a heavy responsibility in educating and inspiring young people to live in ethical and socially responsible ways in a transformed world.

In this call for abstracts, we invite business, computing, and engineering scholars to gather June 3-5, 2015 at the Christian's Scholars Conference at Abilene Christian University in Abilene, TX. Topics can include but are not limited to:

Research Topics

  •     Global trade and competition
  •     Global marketing--including ethical and/or cultural aspects
  •     Computing--health informatics, big data, ethics, smart planet, & others
  •     Corporate social responsibility and the triple bottom line
  •     Global entrepreneurship--creating sustainable value and cures for poverty
  •     Leadership and follow-ship related topics including servant leadership
  •     Social enterprises as vehicles for change
  •     Faith at work--connecting Sunday to Monday
  •     Interdisciplinary engineering, computing, and business related topics

Pedagogy

  •     Student missions--connecting students to ONE WORLD
  •     Co-curricular activities in business, computing, and engineering
  •     Teaching and developing global mindset in aspiring professionals

Please email paper abstracts (maximum 500 words) to Andy.Borchers@lipscomb.edu by February 1, 2015. Abstracts will undergo blind review.  We will then organize one or more sessions based on the quality and nature of submissions.

Alternatively, interested participants may organize generative sessions for the CSC, pending approval by the Business and Engineering section. Generative sessions can be panels, special presentation, or other non-peer reviewed sessions. Send generative session proposals to Andy Borchers (Andy.Borchers@lipscomb.edu) by February 1, 2015. 

Studies in Patristics

The Patristics section of the Christian Scholars' Conference issues an open call for papers pertaining to the field of Patristics. This open session will coincide with the second annual Everett Ferguson Lecture in Early Christian Studies at the Christian Scholars' Conference. 

Faculty members may submit proposals of 300-400 words describing the aim and scope of their papers. PhD students are invited to submit full papers of approximately 10 pages, double spaced. All proposals will be considered by a peer-review committee, which will organize one or two sessions, depending on the number and quality of proposals received.       

Please send proposals papers to Jeff Childers (childersj@acu.edu) no later than January 15, 2015. Paper proposals should include the title of the paper and a brief bio of the author, which will appear in the CSC program, if the paper is accepted. We will notify you whether your paper is accepted by February 15, 2015.

The Civil Rights and Churches of Christ Section: A Call For Proposals

The Churches of Christ, a largely Southern fellowship, has a tenuous history of race relations. The US Civil Rights movement served as spotlight on the myth of unity to reveal the reality of a racially divided fellowship. This section invites paper proposals from researchers in relevant fields in the social sciences and theology that examine the racialized culture of Churches of Christ, how that information is transferred intergenerationally, and how that culture has shaped our operationalization of faith. Furthermore, this section seeks proposals that inspire discourse towards strategies for addressing contemporary issues of race relations within this fellowship, specifically, and throughout society, broadly.

Proposals of 300-400 words will be accepted through January 31. Those submitting will be notified of the status of their proposals by February 15. Accepted proposals must be completed and submitted to the session chair by May 15. Please send proposals and queries to Tanya Brice, Benedict College, bricet@benedict.edu.  

American Religious History Section

The American Religious History peer-reviewed session seeks papers that address science and religion in American history. Paper topics include, but are not limited to the following themes in American history: fundamentalism and creationism, conflict thesis and its antitheses (complexity, control), and faith and reason.

Proposals should include an abstract of approximately 500 words. The deadline for submissions is January 21, 2015. Presentations should be approximately 20 minutes in length and will receive a formal response. All program participants must be registered for the Conference. Please send proposals to Kathy Pulley at kathypulley@missouristate.edu and Joshua Fleer at jfleer@oakland.edu. Participants will be notified by February 5, 2015 of the status of their submission.

Call for Papers, Creative Writing: Non-Fiction and Poetry

Explorations in Counter-Unity: Creative Works

In the Depth of Culture and Faith

This panel will explore personal stories and anecdotes of covert estrangement or alienation from culture, faith, or both expressed through creative non-fiction or poetry. These narratives can be presented in the form of creative non-fiction or poetry of significant length. Each essay or poem will detail an instance of counter-culturalism, within either American culture or faith culture, in which one interacts with ideas or dialogue that questions foundational beliefs. Further, each work should represent an occurrence of counter-culturalism from within culture, rather than a perspective of colliding culture (i.e. an outsider looking in). Stories will detail social burdens—how they affect the individual and implications of these effects. The purpose of this panel is to excavate the substratum of ideologies driven by the rhetoric of culture—narrow or broad; this will demonstrate the quixotic pressures upon these individuals, revealing the experiences of the voiceless, those held prisoner to their own culture. Themes explored will include Christianity, homosexuality, race, feminism, and emerging adulthood.

Please submit a proposal with an abstract of 350-500 words to Brett.Butler@acu.edu and john.struloeff@pepperdine.edu before January 31, 2015. Participants will be notified by February 14. Full papers are due by May 3. Conference presentations should be 18-19 minutes in length and will receive a formal response. All program participants must be registered for the Conference.

Updated 16 November 2014