Biology (BY) Courses

1003 Fundamentals of Biology (3) F, SP, SU
This course is offered for the non-biology major and is designed to develop an interest in the biological world of which he/she is a part. The fundamental principles of biology are covered and special consideration is given to ethical issues with a biological basis. Does not count towards a biology major. Lecture, 3 hours. This course may satisfy the SALT Tier II requirement.

1013 Environmental Biology (3) F
A freshman-level course in environmental science. A study of the natural environment as it relates to ecology, ecosystems, human population growth, soil formation and conservation, biotechnology, toxicology, air and water quality, biodiversity, land use management, energy resources, and waste management. Discussions will include the ethics and policy-making process related to these issues. Does not count towards a biology major. Lecture, 3 hours.

1134 Principles of Biology: Cell and Genetics (4) F, SP
This course is required for all biology majors and minors and should be taken during the freshman year. This course is designed to introduce the student to major concepts of the life sciences with an emphasis on cellular biology. Biological chemistry, organelle structure and function, membrane transport, cell cycles, energy metabolism, genetics and cell synthesis will be covered. Appropriate lab activities are included. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 2 hours.

1144 Principles of Biology: Diversity and Ecology (4) F, SP
This course is required of all biology majors and minors and should be taken during the freshman year. This course is designed to introduce the student to major concepts of the life sciences with an emphasis in botany, zoology, and ecology. Surveys of the kingdoms, plant structure and function, plant hormones, animal structure and function, animal development, animal behavior, and basic ecological concepts will be some of the topics covered. Appropriate lab activities are included. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 2 hours.

2114 Cell Biology (4) F, SP
This course is designed to cover the general principles of cell biology. History of cell biology, cytological techniques, cell boundary, cell physiology, organization of cytoplasm, comparative cytology, cell reproduction, cell inheritance and development are major areas covered. Laboratory experiences include types of microscopy, morphology of procells and eucells, selected exercises in cell physiology, membrane transport, mitosis and meiosis, and special cytological and histological techniques. Prerequisite: Biology 1134 with a minimum grade of “C.” Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 2 hours.

2213 Introductory Human Anatomy and Physiology (3) SP, SU
Fundamental anatomy and physiology of the human body are examined by lectures, readings, and laboratory exercises. The organ systems and their relationships are reviewed with emphasis on practical application when possible. No prerequisites. Lecture, 2 hours; laboratory, 2 hours.

2321 Medical Terminology (1) F, SP
The terminology of the biomedical sciences is reviewed. The use of combining forms, prefixes, and suffixes is emphasized with a goal of better comprehension of written material. No prerequisites. Lecture, 1 hour. Does not count toward the biology major.

2424 Introductory Microbiology (4) SP, SU
Structure, growth and metabolism of microorganisms are discussed briefly with the major emphasis in the course on practical aspects of bacteriology including control of bacterial growth, bacteria of medical interest, and microorganisms in the food and dairy industry. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 3 hours.

2434 Anatomy and Physiology I (4) SP
This course is primarily designed for students in nursing and allied health sciences. The structure and function of the human body are examined with emphasis upon control mechanisms. The major body systems are studied with lecture and laboratory experiences with a systematic approach. Cell structure, physiology and tissue systems will be emphasized. Lecture: 3 hours; laboratory, 2 hours. This course is not open to Biology majors or minors.

2444 Anatomy and Physiology II (4) F
This course is a continuation of Biology 2434. The circulatory, respiratory, digestive, excretory, endocrine, and reproductive systems are studied with emphasis upon homeostasis. Major topics of physiology are integrated with a systematic approach. Prerequisite: Biology 2434. Lecture: 3 hours; laboratory, 2 hours. This course is not open to Biology majors or minors.

2623 Field Botany (3) SP*
A field oriented course designed to familiarize the student with the flowering plants including wildflowers, vines, flowering shrubs, and trees. The general principles of plant systematics are also covered. The field experience will include day trips to natural areas and state parks. One weekend field trip is required (a fee will be charged). Prerequisite: Biology 1144. Lecture, 2 hours; laboratory, 3 hours.

2813 Field Zoology (3) F*
This course is designed to acquaint the student with a variety of field techniques in the collection and identification of animals. The topics covered will also include the preparation and cataloging of specimens. Field experiences will be emphasized. Prerequisite: Biology 1144. Lecture, 2 hours; laboratory, 3 hours.

3001 Biology Seminar
This course is designed for Biology and Molecular Biology majors who have completed Biology 450V or 3903. The course will provide the opportunity for students to improve their oral communication skills by presenting original research or research experience obtained in an internship. Prerequisites: Biology 450V or 3903.

3053 Methods of Teaching Biology (3) F, SP
This course is designed to familiarize the student with a wide variety of sources of biological teaching materials including instrumentation and computer applications. The course also provides experience in planning, in applying the methods of science, and in conducting laboratory and field activities involving students. Special consideration is given to identifying and maintaining the highest level of safety procedures. Lecture-laboratory, 2 hours. Open to biology teaching majors only.

3114 Genetics (4) F, SP
An introduction to the basic concepts and principles of heredity. An historical approach is used to cover both classical and modern genetics including molecular genetics. The laboratory work includes experiments with fruit flies, plants, fungi, and microorganisms. Prerequisite: Biology 1134 with a minimum grade of “C.” Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 2 hours.

3214 Microbiology (4) F
This course is designed to provide a foundation in bacteriology. The first half of the course deals with structure, growth, and metabolism of bacteria; the remainder of the course is spent on several aspects of applied microbiology and includes a survey of medically important bacteria. Prerequisite: Biology 2114 with a minimum grade of “C.” Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 3 hours.

3223 Virology (3) SP*
This course serves to acquaint the student with fundamental aspects of viral structure and reproduction, using bacterial and animal viruses as examples. The latter part of the course includes a survey of viruses important in human disease. Prerequisite: Biology 2114 with a minimum grade of “C.” Lecture, 3 hours.

3323 Immunology (3) SP
This course is designed to acquaint the student with basic aspects of immunology including antigenicity, antibody structure, detection and measurement of antigen-antibody reactions, and hypersensitivity reactions. Prerequisite: Biology 2114 with a minimum grade of “C” and junior standing or permission of instructor. Recommended: Biology 3114. Lecture, 3 hours.

3333 Molecular Basis of Human Disease
This course is designed to equip students to critically read and interact with the scientific literature using primary scientific journals that describe major findings in the molecular basis of human diseases. Effectively presenting disease-relevant scientific journal articles is also a focus of this course. Prerequisites: Biology 2114, 3114 with a minimum grade of “C.”

3413 Limnology (3) SU*
This course instructs the student in the basic aspects of the physical, chemical, and biotic factors of inland (fresh) waters. Both lentic and lotic systems are studied. An extensive use is made of local lakes and streams for laboratory investigation. Lecture, 2 hours; laboratory, 3 hours.

3514 Human Anatomy and Physiology I (4) F
The structure and function of the human body are examined with emphasis upon control mechanisms. The nervous, integumentary, muscular and skeletal systems are studied with lecture and laboratory experiences. There is a regional approach to the anatomy of the extremities, head and neck. Open to biology majors and minors only. Prerequisite: Biology 1134. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 2 hours.

3524 Human Anatomy and Physiology II (4) SP
This course is a continuation of Biology 3514. The circulatory, respiratory, digestive, excretory, endocrine and reproductive systems are studied with emphasis upon homeostasis. Acid balance, fluid balance, and immunity are also integrated into the systematic approach. Prerequisite: Biology 3514 or permission of the instructor. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 2 hours.

3612 Nature Study (2) F, SP
An elementary introduction to the study of the natural world. The course is laboratory and field oriented with both living and nonliving materials being used to introduce the student to his/her natural surroundings. Emphasis is placed upon the student’s developing the ability to identify such things as insects, birds, reptiles, trees, wild flowers, rocks, and minerals. No prerequisites. Lecture, 2 hours; laboratory, 2 hours. Does not count towards a biology major.

3712 Conservation of Natural Resources (2) F, SP
This course is designed to provide the student with a basic understanding of the extent of our natural resources and the problems associated with their conservation. Interrelationships between the biotic and abiotic elements of environment; population dynamics and the effects of population changes on biotic and abiotic resources; geological processes; and pollution of natural resources are studied to provide a factual basis on which action can be taken to properly use our resources and improve our environment. No prerequisites. Lecture, 2 hours. Does not count towards biology major.

3903 Internship in Biology (3) F, SP, SU
The internship provides the opportunity for hands-on experience by working for various agencies, companies, zoos, laboratories, or other groups involved in some aspect of biology. Evaluation will be based on supervisor assessment, regular progress reports, and a summary report at the end of the semester. Arrangements for the internship should be made during the semester preceding the one in which the student plans to register for the course. Prerequisites: Junior standing, completion of at least 19 hours of biology coursework, and permission of the academic chair.†

4013 Molecular Biology (3) SP
This course focuses on current issues in molecular biology. Topics include DNA structure and replication, transcription, RNA processing, translation, regulation of gene expression and variability in DNA. The laboratory covers basic molecular techniques including electrophoresis of DNA, restriction endonuclease digestion and Southern blotting. Prerequisites: Biology 2114, 3114. Lecture, 2 hours; laboratory, 3 hours.

4044 Ecology (4) F, SP
An overview of the science of ecology. Three levels are examined: the individual, the population and community, and the ecosystem. Some major concepts covered include abiotic environmental limitations, energy and nutrient flow, population ecology and genetics, and community and ecosystem level interactions. Ecosystems worldwide are discussed, but North American ecosystems are emphasized. Prerequisites: Biology 1134, 1144, 3114. Lecture, 3 hours; laboratory, 3 hours.

4213 Embryology (3) SP*
A course which emphasizes developmental stages as well as the mechanisms of developmental processes. The emphasis is on mechanisms rather than organisms in the class work. The laboratory work is concerned with experimental embryology and developmental stages of selected organisms. Prerequisite: Biology 3114. Lecture, 2 hours; laboratory, 2 hours.

4323 Histology (3) SP
The study of microscopic anatomy of the human is undertaken with the emphasis upon visual materials. The primary tissues are reviewed in detail, followed by a survey of selected organs. Prerequisite: Biology 2114 with a minimum grade of “C.” Lecture, 2 hours; laboratory, 2 hours.

4413 Vertebrate Zoology (3) F*
A general survey of vertebrate animals, with special emphasis on comparative anatomy. Laboratory assignments include considerable dissection and often require independent lab work. Prerequisite: Biology 1144 with a minimum grade of “C.” Lecture, 2 hours; laboratory, 2 hours.

450V Independent Research (1, 2) F, SP, SU
The student chooses an area of particular interest, and together with the instructor a research problem is selected. The emphasis may be either field or laboratory oriented. A paper is written and submitted at the end of the course. The course is designed to provide the student an opportunity to pursue independent research and provide experience in scientific writing. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and academic chair.†

460V Special Topics in Biology (1-4) F, SP, SU
Selected topics from the field of biology are offered. The course may be either lecture or laboratory-oriented depending upon the topic selected. The study represents an in-depth approach to a specific area of interest to the student. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. The following are some of the most recently offered special topics: science and culture, ethnobotany, medical entomology, parasitology, herpetology, and advanced physiology.

4802 Capstone Course (2) F, SP
In this course the theory of evolution will be investigated in a historical, religious, and scientific context. The focus of the discussion-oriented class will be on macroevolutionary theory. Arguments and evidences in various disciplines used to support the theory are presented with discussion of strengths and weaknesses. The course relies heavily on outside readings from classic and current articles, and books by both creationist and evolutionist apologists. Worldview and its influence on theory formation and acceptance, with emphasis on Christian and naturalistic worldviews, is discussed. Limitations of science and impacts which evolutionary theory has had on other disciplines are also included. Prerequisites: senior standing and a minimum grade of “C” in all major core courses.

 

† No student may be approved for Independent Study, Research or Internship until the Academic Chair has received the appropriate form with the general topic, hours credit and signatures of the student and directing instructor. Forms are available from the academic chair or instructor.

*Offered in alternate years