Spring 2016 Schedule of Classes

Session I - January 25 - February 26

Mondays—The Recluse and the Pop Star: Emily Dickinson and Robert Frost

Jan. 25 and Feb 1, 8, 15, 22
10-11:30 a.m.
Blakeford of Green Hills
11 Burton Hills Blvd, Nashville TN
Cost $60
Instructor: Dennis Loyd, Retired Lipscomb University Professor of English

Emily Dickinson was called the Nun of Amherst because of her reclusive nature. Only seven or eight of her more than 1770 poems were published in her lifetime. In contrast Robert Frost seldom passed up an opportunity to be seen and heard. He was a frequent visitor to colleges and universities and at age 86 read a poem at John F. Kennedy's inauguration. This will be a look at representative poems from two of our most respected poets.

Texts: Emily Dickinson: Selected Poems. Dover #0-486-26466-1
          Robert Frost: A Boy's Will and North of Boston. Dover #0-486-26866-7

Tuesdays—Reading the Renaissance

Jan. 26 and Feb. 2, 9, 16, 23
3-4:30 p.m.
Ezell Center, Room 136
Cost $60
Instructor: Howard Miller, Associate Professor and Chair Department of History, Politics and Philosophy
Lipscomb University

In this class we will consider the meaning of the Italian Renaissance through the words of the Italians themselves. Petrarch, Alberti, Castiglione, Pico, Machiavelli and Vasari will help us better understand the social, intellectual and artistic currents that brought Europe out of the Middle Ages and into the modern age.

Wednesdays—Shakespeare YOU will Understand and Enjoy

Jan. 27 and Feb. 3, 10, 17, 24
1-2:30 p.m.
At the Home of John Parker, located in Oak Hill
Cost $60
Instructor: John Parker, Retired Lipscomb University Professor of English

Professor Parker taught Shakespeare at Lipscomb for 33 years. To this day his favorite subject is showing people how Shakespeare relates directly to their lives in modern culture and helping them to understand and enjoy it. This sampler from two of the most celebrated Shakespeare plays presents two dysfunctional families, each headed by an impossible-to-live-with but fascinating father figure. King Lear of pre-Christian England has a wonderful talent for favoring the two worst daughters you can imagine while turning the best child he could ever ask for out of doors. Ultimately, though, he sees the truth about his family and finds genuine love, even at the very moment of death. Shylock the Jew of Venice relishes beating the Christians he hates in money matters, but he loves his daughter Jessica even as she plots to elope with a Christian husband!
Renaissance Archie Bunker on his worst day, vicious children and despicable and compelling Family Feuds. It’s as 2016 as you can get, all this, plus the option of a live performance of KING LEAR by the Nashville Shakespeare Festival. Come join Professor Parker!

Thursdays—Families Over Time: The Way (We Wish) We Were

Jan. 28 and Feb. 4, 11, 18, 25
3 - 4:30 p.m.
Ezell Center, Room 136
Cost $60
Instructor: John Conger, Lipscomb University Professor and Chair of Family Studies

Families have always been the bedrock of any society. However, both societies and families change over time and, sometimes, history has a way of “cleaning up” our memories. Many of us long for simpler times, when we had time for things we seem to have lost today: family meals, walks, talks and simpler ways. We often are confused and mystified by what’s going on in the heads of our children and grandchildren, and try to make sense of current trends. This class will help us look back, and try to unravel some of the confusion of the current generation of young people, as we all navigate this sometimes-rocky journey of life together as family.

Fridays—Profiling Paul through His Letters: I and II Thessalonians

Jan. 29, and Feb. 5, 12, 19, 26
10-11:30 p.m.
Chumley Hall, Granny White Church of Christ
3805 Granny White Pike
Cost $60
Instructor: Scott Sager, Vice President of Church Services at Lipscomb University

If you journey to the temple at Delphi, there you'll find a Galio inscription which we use to place Paul in Thessalonica in 50-51 A.D. After Paul was driven from Thessalonica and traveled to Corinth he wrote his first two of thirteen letters—the oldest writings of the entire New Testament. Those letters we call I and II Thessalonians. Put on your detective hat and join us for a look behind the letters to profile Paul as the leader of the Gentile church and God's instrument at the epicenter of worldwide movement.

Session II - March 28 - April 29

Mondays—The Recluse and the Pop Star: Emily Dickinson and Robert Frost

Mar. 28 and Apr. 4, 11, 18, 25
Fifty Forward Martin Center
960 Heritage Way, Brentwood TN
10-11:30 a.m.
Cost $60
Instructor: Dennis Loyd, Retired Lipscomb University Professor of English

Emily Dickinson was called the Nun of Amherst because of her reclusive nature. Only seven or eight of her more than 1770 poems were published in her lifetime. In contrast Robert Frost seldom passed up an opportunity to be seen and heard. He was a frequent visitor to colleges and universities and at age 86 read a poem at John F. Kennedy's inauguration. This will be a look at representative poems from two of our most respected poets.

Texts: Emily Dickinson: Selected Poems. Dover #0-486-26466-1
          Robert Frost: A Boy's Will and North of Boston. Dover #0-486-26866-7

Tuesdays—I LOVE Mr. Darcy: The World of Jane Austen

Mar. 29 and April 5, 12, 19, 26
3-4:30 p.m.
Ezell Center, Room 136
Cost $60
Instructor: Kay Wyatt, Retired Lipscomb Academy English Faculty; M.A.T. English from MTSU

“Darcymania,” “Janeites,” “Austenites,” “worldwide Jane Austen societies,”  “prequels, sequels and retellings of Pride and Prejudice,” “zombies,” “Jane Austen festivals”—these are parts of the world of Jane Austen today. This class will look at how the Jane Austen phenomenon came about by considering 1) Austen’s life and times, 2) her most famous novel Pride and Prejudice, 3) the 1995 BBC mini-series of Pride and Prejudice, and 4) Jane Austen’s popularity today, which speaks of her timelessness as a writer. Class participants are encouraged to read Pride and Prejudice.

Wednesdays—Sermon on the Mount

Mar. 30 and Apr. 6, 13, 20, 27
10-11:30 p.m.
Longview Mansion, 811 Caldwell Lane
Cost $60
Instructor: Scott McDowell, Senior Vice President at Lipscomb University

The Sermon on the Mount is the single greatest treatise on how to actually experience the good life as God intended it. Jesus is the greatest moral teacher that ever lived and the Sermon on the Mount is the quintessential exploration of the ethics and lifestyle that Jesus modeled and taught. He approached his audience by inviting them to forget everything they thought they knew about God and we will approach the Sermon on the Mount with the same kind of freshness.

The major resource will be scripture and The Divine Conspiracy by Dallas Willard.

Thursdays—Causes and Effects of World War II

Mar. 31 and Apr. 7, 14, 21, 28
3 - 4:30 pm
Ezell Center, Room 136
Cost $60
Instructor: Jerry Gaw, Lipscomb University Professor of History

During the twenty years following World War I, numerous factors contributed to the coming of a second, and other issues during World War II contributed to the beginning of the Cold War. Without focusing on the wars themselves, this course will look at what led to them and what their legacies have been.

Fridays-- Railroading in Tennessee

Apr. 1, 8, 15, 22, 29
10-11:30 a.m.
Chumley Hall, Granny White Church of Christ
3805 Granny White Pike
Cost $60
Instructor: Terry Coats, Author, Lecturer and Past President of the NC&St.L Railway Preservation Society

In these upcoming sessions we will discuss:
• The coming of the railroads to the mid-south, the development of the railroad business and its effect on early commerce and the development of infrastructure; and a general history of railroading in Tennessee, ca. 1850-2015 (from the Nashville & Chattanooga Railroad to CSX). We will discuss the small railroads that started but did not succeed and were gobbled up by larger railroads.
• The railroads at war —from the Civil War to World War II the railroads were the backbone on which the military moved.
• The Great Wreck at Dutchman's Curve — the worst passenger wreck in American history.
• Down at the train depot — from the standard railroad station to the massive terminals and the men and women that kept the trains, freight and passengers moving safely along.
• Fifth session will be a tour of Union Station.