Fall 2015 Schedule of Classes

Click here for a Printable Registration Form

Session I - August 31- October 2

Mondays—Football 101

August 31 and September 14, 28
(This class will cap at 20 people)
3:00-5:00 p.m.
Ezell Center, Room 136
Cost $60
Instructor: David Williams
Vice Chancellor for University Affairs and Athletics & Athletics Director and Professor of Law Vanderbilt University
 
Join David Williams, Vanderbilt University athletics director, as he discusses the ins and outs of football. We will look at how it’s played, the rules of the game and how to recruit athletes at an SEC school as well as get an inside look at the football program at Vanderbilt.

Tuesdays—Is It True What They Say About Russia?

September 1, 8, 15, 22, 29
3:00-4:30 p.m.
Ezell Center, Room 136
Cost $60
Instructor: Guy Vanderpool
Retired Army Intelligence and NSA agent, Visiting Professor of History and Political Science, Lipscomb University
 
This Session will Address questions such as:
Why Russia occupied Georgia in 2008 and Crimea in 2014?
Why Russia now upsets the status quo in eastern Ukraine?
Why the United States and its partners haven't stopped Russia's moves?
Why Russia has an Autocratic government?
How art, music, and literature reveal Russia's trus essence?
What the outlook is for Russia's internal and Foreign policy?

Wednesdays—The Great American Songbook

September 2, 9, 16, 23, 30
3:00-4:30 p.m.
Ward Auditorium, Room 223
Cost $60
Instructor: Dr. Gary P. Wilson
Director of Choral and Vocal Studies, Lipscomb University
 
The Great American Songbook is the canon of this country’s most important and influential popular songs of the early 20th century, drawn from Broadway theater, Hollywood musicals and radio. Written from the 1920s through the 1950s, the canon includes hundreds of songs of enduring popularity. The first three classes will focus on six writers: Jerome Kern, Irving Berlin, George Gershwin, Richard Rodgers, Cole Porter and Harold Arlen.
The next class will focus on the revival of these songs that occurred during the 1970s and 1980s and some of the singers who have revived the tradition. The last class will focus on the Michael Feinstein Great American Songbook Initiative, located in Carmel, Ind. This project was launched by singer/pianist Feinstein in the late 1970s to preserve and promote the music of this genre. 

Thursdays—Five Ladies from Nashville's Past (Meeting at Fifty Forward)

September 3, 10, 17, 24 and October 1
10:00-11:30 a.m.
Fifty Forward Martin Center, 960 Heritage Way, Brentwood
Cost $60
Instructor: Elizabeth Coker
Local Historian
 
In five dramatizations, learn more about the life and times of these women: Jane Brown, mother of one of the first families of Tennessee who was captured by Indians and rescued and exchanged by John Sevier; Lucinda “Granny” White, an early pioneer; Adelicia Hayes Franklin Acklen Cheatham, the Southern belle of Nashville; Miss Jane Thomas, the consummate little old lady; and Margaret “Aunt Mag” Lipscomb, wife of Lipscomb University founder, David Lipscomb.

Thursdays Continued--From Europe to America: The Development of a Unique Religious Movement

September 3, 10, 17, 24 and October 1
3:00-4:30 p.m.
Ezell Center, Room 136
Cost $60
Instructor: Dr. Bob Hooper
Retired Professor of History, Lipscomb University
 
The earliest religious movements in America developed from unrest in the British Isles. The Pilgrims, followed by the Puritans, established the colony of Massachusetts. From that time forward, religion has played a major role in the history of the United States. In the early 19th century, another religious movement crossed the Atlantic Ocean to grow in American soil. That soil had already been prepared by Americans, especially those on the frontier. Barton Stone was a major participant in the Cane Ridge Revival. Thomas and Alexander Campbell brought a John Locke-type interpretation to religion in America. Both Stone and the Campbells led movements characterized by a democratic approach that fit early 19th century America.

Fridays—Nashville History Rediscovered

September 4, 11, 18, 25 and October 2
10:00-11:30 a.m.
Meeting at Chumley Hall, Granny White Church of Christ, 3805 Granny White Pike
Cost $60
Instructor: Paul Clements
Tennessee Historian and Author
 
This series will cover topics which have been largely overlooked, misunderstood or oversimplified:
James Robertson - Out from the Shadows
The Battle of the Bluff and the Chronology of America
Unearthing the Jackson-Dickinson Duel
Slavery and Shades of Gray
Musings on Nashville History
 

Session II - October 20 - November 23

Mondays—Innovative Courts

October 26 and November 2, 9, 16, 23
3:00-4:30 p.m.
Ezell Center, Room 136
Cost $60
Instructor: Judge Tim Easter
Tennessee Court of Criminal Appeals
 
This course will explore new efforts within the judicial branch, reengineering how criminal courts in the United States handle cases in specialized courtrooms to insure the process fits the problem. The objective is to learn the different processes of handling criminal matters in the United States by examining an entrepreneurial approach to problem-solving courts. Specifically, we will research four of the approximately 12 kinds of such courts including drug courts, domestic violence courts, community courts and mental health courts.

Tuesdays—Digital Media and How It Has Affected Communication

October 20, 27 and November 3, 10, 17
3:00-4:30 p.m.
Ezell Center, Room 136
Cost $60
Instructor: Dr. Paul Prill
Professor of Communication, Lipscomb University
 
In 1964, Marshall McLuhan published a ground-breaking work, “Understanding Media: The Extensions of Man,” which formed the basis of much media analysis for the next two decades. Social media (Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Snapchat and Vine among many others) have further extended the definition of human interaction. This class will explore the assets and liabilities of our social media use.
Reference Material: “The Shallow,” Nicholas Carr; “The Filter Bubble,” Eli Pariser; and “Alone Together,” Sherry Turkle

Wednesdays—Paul's Letter to the Ephesians

October 21, 28 and November 4, 11, 18
10:00-11:30 a.m.
Center for Spiritual Renewal, Longview Mansion, 811 Caldwell Lane, Nashville
Cost $60
Instructor: Dr. Carl McKelvey
Executive Director, Center for Spiritual Renewal, Lipscomb University
 
This class will be a study of Paul’s letter that has remained “ever new.” It is as fresh and vital to those who study it today as when first written. The class will include lectures and discussions on such topics as:
     God brings all things in heaven and earth together under one head, Christ Jesus.
     God's action of reconciliation as an act of grace.
     Breaking down barriers.
     The mystery of God revealed.
     Practical suggestions for walking in the light.

Thursdays—Five Ladies from Nashville's Past

October 22, 29 and November 5, 12, 19
10:00-11:30 a.m.
Blakeford at Greenhills, 11 Burton Hills Blvd., Nashville
Cost $60
Instructor: Elizabeth Coker
Local Historian
 
In five dramatizations, learn more about the life and times of these women: Jane Brown, mother of one of the first families of Tennessee who was captured by Indians and rescued and exchanged by John Sevier; Lucinda “Granny” White,” an early pioneer; Adelicia Hayes Franklin Acklen Cheatham, the Southern belle of Nashville; Miss Jane Thomas, the consummate little old lady; and Margaret “Aunt Mag” Lipscomb, wife of Lipscomb University founder, David Lipscomb.
 

Thursdays Continued—Art Deco: High Style of the 20's and 30's

October 22, 29 and November 5, 12, 19
3:00-4:30 p.m.
Ezell Center, Room 136
Cost $60
Instructor: John Bridges
Author, Historian, Musician and Antique Car Collector
 
From about 1925 until the beginning of WWII, a new style called Art Deco swept America and many European countries. From the Bauhaus to our house, Art Deco influenced art, architecture, trains, automobiles, housewares and even clothing and jewelry. This fresh new style projected clean, uncluttered and streamlined. During the Great Depression, the new technology-inspired style promised a better future was ahead. By using a series of photos along with explanations, trace design elements as far back as ancient Egypt, Greece, Rome and later, France, and show how each eventually contributed to the very popular Art Deco style.

Fridays-- A Tale of Two Parthenons: Athens and Nashville

October 23, 30 and November 6, 13, 20
10:00-11:30 a.m.
Chumley Hall, Granny White Church of Christ, 3805 Granny White Pike
Cost $60
Instructor: Wesley Paine
Director of the Parthenon and co-author of "Classical Nashville"
 
This course examines the construction of the ancient Parthenon in Greece, with an emphasis on the extraordinary engineering feats involved (how did they DO that?) and the reasons for its construction in the context of time and place. A quick look at the far-reaching influence of the Parthenon on western civilization will follow. That influence gave rise to Nashville’s view of itself as the “Athens of the South” and resulted in the construction of a replica here. The class will learn about construction (twice) of Nashville’s Parthenon as well as its statue of Athena and will culminate in a field trip for a behind- the-scenes tour of this important icon.
*This class will be a Travel Learning Course for the Footsteps of Paul trip that Scott Sager will host in March. One site on the trip is Athens, Greece, and the original Parthenon. Those registering for the trip take this class free of charge.