Spring 2017 Class Schedule

Session I - February 6 - March 10

Mondays—Mark Twain: The Man and His Works
Feb. 6, 13, 20, 27 and Mar. 6
3-4:30 p.m.
Ezell Center, Room 109
Cost $60 per session
Instructor: Dennis Loyd, Retired Professor of English, Lipscomb University
 
No other American writer has been so influenced by the Mississippi River as Mark Twain. He grew up in Hannibal Missouri, where he watched with admiration the boats as they moved up and down the river. He became a riverboat pilot until the Civil War ceased all traffic don the river. He would write about the influence of the river in numerous works. Join us as we discover the power of this big river as chronicled by Mark Twain.
The textbook for this course will be “Mark Twain: Tales, Speeches, Essays, and Sketches,” ed. Tom Quirk.  ISBN# 0-14-043417-8
class.
 
Tuesdays—The American Presidency: Leadership and Communication in the First 100 Days
Feb. 7, 14, 21, 28 and Mar. 7
3-4:30 p.m.
Ezell Center, Andrews Institute, Room 359
Cost $60
Instructor: Linda Peek Schacht, College of Leadership and Public Service, Lipscomb University
 
Join Linda Peek Schacht for a look at the first months of the Presidency of Donald J. Trump.  This promises to be a First 100 Days like no other. We will look at it through the lens of history, leadership theory, and Presidential communication and analyze early actions in relationships with Congress, the media, and the public.
 
Wednesdays—Abide With Me: The Stories and the Inspiration of the Great Classic Hymns
Feb. 8, 15, 22, and Mar. 1, 8
1-2:30 a.m.
At the home of John Parker, located in Oak Hill
Cost $60
Instructor: John Parker, Retired Professor of English, Lipscomb University
 
If you love the classic hymns including Amazing Grace; Abide with Me; Just as I Am; Holy, Holy, Holy; Rock of Ages; Take My Life and Let it Be; and Joy to the World, you are invited to the home of Lipscomb professors  Jill and John Parker near Lipscomb to learn about the authors, teaching, and singing of the hymns and why they should be preserved and promoted to new generations. Dr. John is the author of the book Abide with Me: a Photographic Journey Through Great British Hymns with European photographer Dr. Paul Seawright (23,000 copies distributed) and lectures on the hymns for churches and groups on invitation. In 2010 he led a tour in England of the hymn sites as part of the Life-Long Learning program.  
Class is limited to 36.
 
Thursdays—Hey, That's MY Town! Nashville's Past, Present and Future
Feb. 9, 16, 23 and Mar. 2, 9
3-4:30 p.m.
Ezell Center, Room 109
Cost $60
Facilitator: Phil Ellenburg, Vice President for Alumni Relations, Lipscomb University
 
Join us as we take a walk down memory lane and peer into our crystal ball as our guest panelists look at Nashville the way it was, the way it is and the way it might be.  Each week, well-known Nashville personalities will discuss a different facet of our wonderful city.  Topics such as Nashville politics, entertainment, safety and security, business and sports are sure to keep the information interesting and the discussion lively!
 
Fridays—Folklore of the Southern Appalachian
Feb. 10, 17, 24 and Mar. 3, 10
10-11:30 a.m.
Blakeford of Green Hills
11 Burton Hills Blvd, Nashville TN
Cost $60
Instructor: Fred Frawley, Folklorist and Minstrel
 
In this class we will look at the oral tradition in stories and songs from the mountains of East Tennessee and Western North Carolina. Each week we will look at a different aspect of oral tradition. These will include:
An Intro to the Art of storytelling, Tall Tales and Jack Tales
Ancient Tales and Ghost Stories
Richard Chase-the story catcher, Americas foremost folklorist, and Contemporary storytellers, Donald Davis and David Holt
Folk songs from the Appalachians, weaving instruments and songs into the story
Your chance to be a storyteller

 

Session II - March 27 - April 28

Mondays—Neighboring Faiths: A Brief Survey of World Religions
Mar. 27 and Apr. 3, 10, 17, 24
3-4:30 p.m.
Ezell Center, Room 109
Cost $60 per session
Instructor: Scott Sager, Vice President of Church Services, Lipscomb University
 
In this course we will give special attention to the World Relgions and their off-shoots located in and around Israel. Special attention will be given to Judaism, Islam, Egyptian gods and goddesses and the gods of the Bedouin tribal peoples as well. This survey course will hit the highlights of world religions and then explain various sects which arise out of each one. The professor does not claim to be an expert on any world religion (even Christianity!) but will give an informed and easily understandble explanation of each.
 
Tuesdays—The History and Creation of the Tennessee Bicentennial Mall
Mar. 28 and Apr. 4, 11, 18, 25
3-4:30 p.m.
Ezell Center, Room 109
Cost $60
Instructor: Kem Hinton, Architect and Author
John Bridges, Historian and Author
 
Once the tallest structure in Nashville, Tennessee's magnificent State Capitol building gradually lost its prominence as one skyscraper after another obstructed our view. While gazing out of a third story window of the old Elliot School on Jefferson Street, John Bridges realized that the state capitol was visible from a distance only from the north. He knew if the wasteland before him was not replaced by a park, soon the last good view of the capitol would be lost forever. When then governor, Ned Ray McWherter saw Bridges' park concept booklet, he immediately recognized the park's potential as the central theme of Tennessee's upcoming 200th birthday celebration. Tuck-Hinton Architects were commissioned to turn a raw idea into the magnificent reality we enjoy today. Kem Hinton, lead designer of the project will explain the many features of the mall and the various approaches evaluated before the final design was selected. Using excerpts from his book, A Long Path, Hinton will help us to understand how this wonderful, yet complicated project was brought to fruition.
 
Wednesdays—Dig This! Archaeology and the Bible
Mar. 29 and Apr. 5, 12, 19, 26
3-4:30 p.m.
Ezell Center, Room 109
Cost $60
Instructor: Tom Riley, Outreach Director, Bible and Ministry, Lipscomb University
 
The land of Israel has been called “The Fifth Gospel.” We know the four Gospels of the New Testament: Matthew, Mark, Luke and John. We study them to learn about the life and ministry of Jesus. By calling the land of Israel “The Fifth Gospel,” we are saying that the physical location of Jesus’ ministry has something to say about all of this. The land itself (and that which is buried within it) can be instructive.
In this course, we will discover that archaeology is not just about archaic languages, dusty holes, piles of rocks and hard to spell terms. It can be exciting. By studying some key archaeological sites in Israel, we will find the occasional gem. Some truth. Some new insight that gives deeper meaning to things we’ve read all our lives.
Join us as we discover together. Let’s investigate some monumental finds (like the Dead Sea Scrolls) and even some lesser-known discoveries (like the inscription about Pontius Pilate). We might just come to see that archaeology not only supports and affirms the names, places, and events recorded in the Bible, it also has the potential to expand our understanding and enjoyment of the Bible.
 
Thursdays—How Films Tell Stories
Mar. 30 and Apr. 6, 13, 20, 27
3-4:30 pm
Ezell Center, Room 109
Cost $60
Instructor: Larry Brown, Professor of Film Studies, Lipscomb University
 
Larry A. Brown, professor of film studies at Lipscomb University, will give a presentation on the narrative techniques of Hollywood films, based on a new textbook he has written. He will discuss how the fictional world of the story is communicated through the medium of cinema. Topics will include aspects of plot, characters, time, editing, sound, and music. The presentations will use clips from famous films as we explore the narrative strategies of cinema.
 
Fridays-- Folklore of the Southern Appalachian
Mar. 31 and Apr. 7, 14, 21, 28
10-11:30 a.m.
Fifty Forward Martin Center
960 Heritage Way, Brentwood TN
Cost $60
Instructor: Fred Frawley, Folklorist and Minstrel
 
In this class we will look at the oral tradition in stories and songs from the mountains of East Tennessee and Western North Carolina. Each week we will look at a different aspect of oral tradition. These will include:
An Intro to the Art of storytelling, Tall Tales and Jack Tales
Ancient Tales and Ghost Stories
Richard Chase-the story catcher, Americas foremost folklorist, and Contemporary storytellers, Donald Davis and David Holt
Folk songs from the Appalachians, weaving instruments and songs into the story
Your chance to be a storyteller